From  the  book


SURPRISING  THINGS  YOU  SHOULD  KNOW  ABOUT  GOD #6


What God


Really Said


"God helps those who help themselves." This quote is in fact from Benjamin Franklin, despite the fact that most people assume it comes from the Book of Proverbs. The words were made famous by President John F. Kennedy when he used them in one of his speeches.


"A land flowing with milk and honey" were the words God used to describe Palestine to Moses in Exodus 3:8. They are now generally used to describe a fine or pleasant place.


"An eye for an eye" first appears in Leviticus 24:20. Rather than being a vindictive call for revenge, it actually limited the damage one person could do to another when taking retribution. Human nature encourages an individual to hurt others, but the Old Testament Law wanted to limit that hurt to equivalent damage.


[NOPE!  ISRAEL  WAS  NEVER  A  COUNTRY  WITH  ONE  EYED  MEN,  ONE  ARM  PEOPLE,  OR  ONE  LEG  PEOPLE.  THE  JEWS  HAVE  NEVER  IN  THEIR  HISTORY  TAKEN  THIS  TO  MEAN  “EQUIVALENT  DAMAGE”  -  IT  WAS  TAKEN  AS  A  “JUST  MONETARY  RECOMPENSE”  LAW;  THE  JUDGES  OF  ISRAEL  HAD  TO  DETERMINE  WHAT  WAS  A  JUST  MONETARY  PENALTY  IN  THE  SITUATION;  FOR  A  RIGHT  ARM  COULD  BE  A  LARGE  PENALTY  BECAUSE  THE  PERSON’S  LIVELIHOOD  WAS  MAINLY  WITH  THE  RIGHT  ARM;  ALL  THE  SITUATION  HAD  TO  BE  JUDGED  JUSTLY  -  Keith Hunt]

    

"With God all things are possible." After explaining to the disciples how it would be easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle than for a rich man to enter heaven, the disciples were understandably disillusioned with the concept of anyone getting into heaven. Jesus assured them that though it would be futile with men in charge, with God it was certainly possible to enter heaven (Matt. 19:25-26).


[IT  DOES  NOT  SAY  “ENTER  HEAVEN”  -  THE  KINGDOM  OF  HEAVEN  OR  KINGDOM  OF  GOD,  IS  NOT  SAYING  WE  GO  TO  HEAVEN -  THAT  IS  A  CATHOLIC/PROTESTANT  TEACHING  -    IT  IS  THE  KINGDOM  THAT  BELONGS  TO  HEAVEN  -  ACTUALLY  THAT  KINGDOM  WILL  BE  ON  THIS  EARTH,  COVERED  FULLY  IN  MANY  STUDIES  ON  THIS  WEBSITE -Keith Hunt]


"The faith to move mountains." Although not currently used quite as often as it was in the twentieth century, the phrase refers to the power of belief. Jesus used this expression in Matthew 17:20 when talking to his disciples about healing the sick and the demon possessed.


"What God hath joined together ..." Jesus spoke these words when he talked of marriage being a permanent covenant in Mark 10:9 (KJV). The words remain an important part of the traditional marriage ceremony even today.


[THE  SUBJECT  OF  MARRIAGE  AND  DIVORCE,  IS  NOT  JUST  A  MATTER  OF  SAYING  “PERMANENT  COVENANT”  -  IT  IS  A  SUBJECT  I  COVER IN-DEPTH  UNDER  MY  STUDY  “DIVORCE  AND  RE-MARRIAGE”  ON  THIS  WEBSITE  -  Keith Hunt]

  

"The salt of the earth." Many of the expressions we use in our culture come from the Lord Jesus. In describing his disciples with these words in Matthew 5:13, Christ emphasized their value—salt being the preferred method of payment in those days. The phrase is still used to describe people we find valuable or important.


"Holier than thou." God condemned those who considered themselves more self-righteous than their counterparts when he spoke against this attitude in Isaiah 65:2-5 (KJV). God mocked those who took such a position.


"Seek and ye shall find." These oft-quoted words of Jesus come from his Sermon on the Mount in Matthew 7:7 (KJV). It is still generally used as advice or encouragement to those who need to be seeking God's purpose and direction.


"The blind leading the blind . . ." Jesus spoke of false teachers when he used this expression. His point was that those teachers who are blind (do not know the real truth) cannot lead others anywhere that followers would want to go. Both the teacher and the followers will be lost and "fall into a ditch" as the verse goes on to say (Matt. 15:14 KJV).


[IT  DOES  NOT  SAY  THEY  WILL  BE  LOST;  IT  MERELY  SAYS  BOTH  THE  TEACHER  AND  THE  FOLLOWER  END  UP  WRONG  AND  OFF  THE  STRAIGHT  AND  NARROW.  IT  IS  A  WARNING  TO  KNOW (BY  SEARCHING  THE  SCRIPTURES  AND  AS  PAUL  SAID  “PROVE  ALL  THINGS”)  WHO  TEACHES  THE  REAL  TRUTH  OF  GOD’S  WORD  -  Keith Hunt]


"The spirit is willing, but the flesh is weak." Jesus spoke these words to his disciples the night of his betrayal. The disciples had fallen asleep after Jesus asked them to keep watch and pray with him. What is less quoted are the words Jesus quoted to the disciples before this phrase: "Watch and pray, that ye enter not into temptation" (Matt. 26:41 KJV). These words remind us why good intentions often lose out to weaknesses. Clearly Jesus suggested prayer and watchfulness to combat our weak flesh.


"The wolf in sheep's clothing." Jesus used this concept to describe false prophets who came to the people appearing as true teachers. He said, "Inwardly they are ferocious wolves" (Matt. 7:15), meaning that they were hypocrites and meant to lead people out of the safe "pasture" and into dangerous territory theologically.


[AND  JESUS  SAID  BEFORE  HE  CAME  AGAIN,  MANY  FALSE  TEACHERS  WOULD  ARISE  AND  DECEIVE  NOT  THE  FEW  BUT  THE  MANY  -  Keith Hunt]


"Cleanness of body was ever deemed to proceed from a due reverence to God," Francis Bacon (1561-1626) stated in his personal writings. Though Bacon might have wished it to be from the Bible, it is, in fact, not stated anywhere in that Book. From it many people have quoted, although the most popular version would be by John Wesley. "Cleanliness is next to godliness." Stated by Wesley in 1772, the phrase "Certainly this is a duty, not a sin" preceded this now-famous quote. Though this might be a nice thought, it is hardly a biblical one and did not come from God.


"Do not throw pearls before swine." Jesus' words in Matthew 7:6 urge believers to take care with their message; it is not necessary to teach to those who are openly hostile to the gospel. A person wouldn't throw precious pearls to pigs, and Christians shouldn't throw the gift of salvation to those who will only turn around and attack them.


"Eat, drink, and be merry" was a phrase spoken by Jesus in Luke 12 while telling a cautionary tale about a rich fool thinking the rest of his life was set. The fool died that very night. The words are still generally used in a sarcastic or pejorative sense.


"The straight and narrow." Following the small, less traveled path leads to the narrow gate of life. In Matthew 7:14, Jesus cautioned people against following the more glamorous, broad, and well-traveled path that led to a wide gate full of destruction.


[THIS  SHOWS  THAT  SALVATION  IS  CONFINED  TO  A  NARROW  SET  OF  CONDITIONS,  AND  NOT  “GIVE  YOUR  HEART  TO  THE  LORD,  AND  FIND  THE  CHURCH  OF  YOUR  CHOICE”  WHICH  CHURCHES  CAN  BE  SO  DIFFERENT  FROM  EACH  OTHER,  IT  CAN  GO  FROM  NIGHT  TO  DAY,  IN  DIFFERENCES  THEY  WANT  YOU  TO  LIVE  BY  -  Keith Hunt]

  

"The apple of my eye" is a phrase first used in Deuteronomy 32:10 to describe God's perspective of Israel. The Hebrew words literally mean "center" or "pupil" of the eye, but in the poetic sense the expression refers to someone or something highly valued by another. The poet David asks God in Psalm 17:8 to "keep me as the apple of your eye."

………………..


I’M  SURE  THERE  ARE  MANY  MORE  PHRASES  THAT  COULD  HAVE  COME  UNDER  THIS  CHAPTER,  BUT  THAT  IS  ALL  THAT  IS  GIVEN   BY  THE  AUTHORS  -  Keith Hunt