QUESTIONS  #11



Is Global Warming Occurring? 

If So, What Causes It?


Global warming—an emotionally charged social, political, economic, and ecological issue—is occurring. As a result, world economies will be altered, and poorer countries may be less able to advance. Thousands of researchers with conflicting solutions to the problem are competing for funds. However, before billions of dollars are spent, global warmings cause should be clearly understood.


All can agree that the Sun's output varies and historical records show wide swings in temperature over the centuries. Nevertheless, the net trend toward global warming will probably continue, but for a surprising reason. We should first understand why the earth has so much ice—7 million cubic miles, mainly in Antarctica and Greenland. If all that ice melts, sea level will rise at least 200 feet.1……




Does mankind's burning of fossil fuels and production of greenhouse gases contribute to global warming? Of course, but no one really knows to what extent.3 Those who claim that man is the sole cause of global warming have not addressed the key question: Why does the earth have so much ice in the first place? Apart from the worldwide flood, explanations for the Ice Age run into scientific problems. Scientists who have studied the Ice Age in great detail know these problems, although few others do.


Since the peak of the Ice Age, melting ice has raised sea level about 300 feet;7 man did not cause that rise. (Man began increasing C02 emissions thousands of years later, in about 1800, at the start of the industrial revolution.) Without some unexpected development, sea level will rise 200 feet more in the next few thousand years. This steady rise will be apparent to all in a few decades. If increasing greenhouse gases turn out to be a major factor, the rise will be even faster.


Yes, atmospheric C02 (carbon dioxide) is increasing, but most of the increase is due to the warming of oceans, which then release some of the C02 they contain. (Oceans contain 50 times more C02 than the atmosphere.) In other words, C02 increases did not produce much global warming; warming produced most C02 increases.


Those who express opinions on the cause of global warming usually look at its effects today and, using a few relatively recent clues, try to determine its cause. The hydroplate explanation takes a much broader, relatively long-range look, not just from effect back to cause, but also from cause directly to effect. We can have much greater confidence in our conclusion when, after considering all the data, including the Ice Age and its causes, the issue is seen identically in both directions. The flood also explains many other features on the earth.





Antarctic Lakes

Historical evidence, described in Figure 179, also shows that snow depths on Antarctica increased recently and rapidly. As they did, lakes were quickly covered and insulated from the cold antarctic air. As a result, more than 155 lakes, 1-280 kilometers long, are still unfrozen today in Antarctica. One, Lake Vostok, the sixth largest lake in the world, has the volume of Lake Michigan.4

How could Antarctica have one or, more surprisingly, at least 155 unfrozen lakes buried under snow and ice—a "preposterous"5 discovery made in the 1990s? To answer this requires answering two basic questions:

How could a lake form on Antarctica?

After all these years, why would even one Antarctic lake still be unfrozen?

The flood provides an obvious answer to the first question. When the flood waters drained into the newly formed ocean basins, every continental basin, including those on Antarctica, were left full of water—some with warm and salty water. Therefore, Antarctica had lakes immediately after the flood. Those who deny a global flood must find a way to warm Antarctica enough to create lakes. According to the plate tectonic theory, Antarctica has always been at the South Pole, so proponents of that theory cannot claim that Antarctica drifted in from warm latitudes. Nor did volcanic activity provide the necessary heat, because Antarctica has few volcanoes and most are not near those 155 lakes.

Once a thin sheet of ice forms on a lake in Antarctica, a "race" begins between (1) ice growing downward and (2) snow building upward. The winner will determine if the lake becomes a solid block of ice or a deeply buried liquid lake. Each year, the ice will grow downward and thicken, at a steady but diminishing rate. Simultaneously, snow will build up above the lake. If the snow's thickness reaches about 2,000 feet before the downward growing ice touches the lake bottom, the lake will be insulated enough to retain its heat and not completely freeze; the slight amount of geothermal heat coming up through the floor of the lake will then prevent it from freezing solid.

Of course, the annual snowfall, the average air temperature, and the lake's initial depth and salt content will determine the winner. Today, Antarctica has less than 2 inches of precipitation each year, and the average air temperature is 20°E (-6.7°C) in the summer and -30°F (-34.4°C) in the winter. Under today's conditions, the ice should win that race on Antarctica, especially if the initial lake is shallow. If the lake is deep or salty, snow has a better chance of winning. However, for those who do not accept a global flood, explaining how deep or salty lakes developed on Antarctica is especially difficult.

If one accepts a global flood, the first question has the italicized answer above. The second question is answered when one realizes that for centuries after the flood, snowfall rates would be orders of magnitude greater than today, and many postflood lakes would be salty and deep. The more a lake freezes,, the greater the salt's concentration becomes in the remaining liquid, so its freezing temperature drops. Ice growth rates would quickly approach zero. Snow would win. One extensively studied subsurface lake in Antarctica, Lake Vida, has seven times the salt concentration of our oceans!6

Because Antarctica has so many subsurface lakes, conditions must have been favorable for Antarctic lakes to form. This, by itself, suggests that there was a global flood followed by extreme rates of snowfall—the Ice Age.




Ancient Map Shows Recent Antarctic Snow Accumulation, in 1929, this amazing map was discovered in an old palace in Constantinople (Istanbul), Turkey. The map, drawn on gazelle skin, was signed in 1513 by Turkish admiral Piri Re'is [Pear ee RYE us]. The Admiral wrote on the map that it was based on 20 older maps, some dating back to the 4th Century B.C. and one used by Christopher Columbus. The Piri Re'is map shows, with amazing accuracy for the 16th Century, parts of Africa, Europe, the Americas, and Antarctica. Surprisingly, details show that Piri Re'is must have had a source map that was drawn before snow was deep enough to cover the rugged Antarctic coastline. Forgery can be ruled out, because we would learn the shapes of those ice-covered coastlines only after the development of seismic techniques for penetrating deep ice.

The Atlantic Ocean runs down the center of the map. (Disregard the symbols and focus on coastlines.) Notice at the upper right of the map the bulge of Africa and the Iberian Peninsula (today's Spain and Portugal). Next, locate a "skinny" South America. While some scales on the map are distorted and some marginal notes are incorrect, the shapes of the above continents are unmistakable. Finally, in the extreme south is part of the Antarctic coast called Queen Maud Land. Today, glaciers extend far beyond, and hide, that irregular coastline.

Copies of the Piri Re'is map are held by the U.S.Library of Congress and other leading libraries. Charles Hapgood8 gives many details of Piri Re'is and other old maps that show a relatively ice-free Antarctica: Oronteus Finaeus, 1531; Hadju Ahmed, 1559; and Mercator, 1569. These medieval maps, copied 2-3 centuries before 1819 (when textbooks say Antarctica was discovered) were probably based on much earlier source maps. These and other9 medieval maps also suggest much lower sea levels before the Ice Age. (The hydroplate theory explains why lowered sea levels were followed by the Ice Age.) The maps provide additional information on Antarctica's mountain ranges, plateaus, bays, coastal islands, and former rivers—under about a mile of ice today. Obviously, the Antarctic ice cap grew rapidly and recently10 as humans were exploring the earth.11 The ice cap did not grow,, as taught for the last century, over millions of years or before man allegedly evolved.

………………..


JUST  A  FEW  DAYS  AGO  IN  JULY  2015,  THEY  GAVE  THE

NEWS  THAT  2014  WAS  THE  WARMEST  YEAR  ON  RECORD.

AND  WE  CERTAINLY  ARE  SEEING  MORE  FREQUENT  WILD

WEATHER  OF  EVERY  SHAPE  AND  SIZE.

WHAT  HAS  HAPPENED  THROUGH  THE  HISTORY  OF  

MANKIND  ON  EARTH,  MAY  NOT  BE  FULLY  REALIZED  

UNTIL  JESUS  COMES  AND  ALL  PAST  HISTORY  LAID

OUT  BEFORE  US.  WE  DO  KNOW  THAT  THE  SOUTH  POLE  

IS  MELTING;  THAT  MANY  OF  THE  GLACIERS  OF  THE  

CANADIAN  ROCKIES  HAVE  DISAPPEARED.  WE  KNOW

THAT  THE  NORTH  POLE  IS  MELTING.


ALL  SCIENTISTS  BUT  A  VERY  FEW,  AGREE  WE  ARE

SEEING  THE  A  WARMING  OF  THE  EARTH'S  CLIMATE.

AND  THEY  AGREE  PART  OF  THE  BLAME  MUST  BE  PUT

ON  THE  INDUSTRIALIZED  WORLD, AND  WHAT  IT  HAS 

THROWN  INTO  THE  ATMOSPHERE  SINCE  THE  INDUSTRIAL

REVOLUTION. 

Keith Hunt