PENTECOST  2015  MESSAGE


PAUL  WAS  INSPIRED  TO  SAY  "LET  THIS  MIND  BE  IN  YOU,  THAT  WAS  IN  CHRIST  JESUS" (PHIL. 2:5).

JESUS  SAID  THAT  THE  FATHER  AND  HE  WOULD  COME  AND  LIVE  WITHIN  THE  CHILD  OF  GOD (JOHN 14:23).  JESUS  ALSO  SAID  IN  THE  SAME  CHAPTER,  "If  you  love  me,  keep  my  commandments,  And  I  will  pray  the  Father,  and  He  shall  give  you another  Comforter,  that  he  may  abide  with  you  forever. Even  the  Spirit  of  truth;  whom  the  world  cannot  receive,  because  it  seems  him  not  neither  knows  him,  but  you  know  him, for  he  dwells  with  you  and  shall  be  in  you" (verses 15-17).


WE  KNOW  FROM  MANY  OTHER  VERSES  IN  THE  NEW  TESTAMENT,  THAT  ALL  THIS  MEANS  IT  IS  THE  HOLY  SPIRIT  IN  US,  WHEREBY  THE  FATHER  AND  CHRIST  COME  TO  LIVE  IN  US.


HAVING  THEM  IN  US  MEANS  WE  HAVE  THEIR  NATURE,  THEIR  MIND!


IT  ALSO  MEANS  WE  HAVE  WITHIN  US  THE  POWER  TO  MATURE  INTO  BEING  MORE  LIKE  THEY  ARE,  IN  MIND,  IN  THOUGHT,  IN  ACTION.


SO  ON  THIS  PENTECOST  DAY  OF  2015  WE  SHALL  LOOK  AT  EXAMPLES,  QUOTES,  STORIES….. THINGS  THAT  PERTAIN  TO  MATURITY  AND  THE  MIND  WE  NEED  TO  HAVE  AS  CHILDREN  OF  THE  MOST  HIGH  GOD.



FROM  THE  BOOK:  "750  ENGAGING ILLUSTRATIONS"



Mind


At the Wright Patterson Air Force base in Dayton, Ohio, researchers hope they will develop the means for pilots to fly airplanes with their minds. The project is called brain-actuated control.


Writers Ron Kotulak and Jon Van say this is how it could work. The pilot would wear scalp monitors that pick up electrical signals from various points on his head. The scalp monitors would be wired to a computer. Using biofeedback techniques, the pilot would learn to manipulate the electrical activity created by his or her thought processes. The computer would translate the electrical signals into mechanical commands for the airplane.


Imagine being able to bank an airplane's wings, accelerate, and climb another ten thousand feet, all by controlling what you think.


Although controlling airplanes with the mind is yet to be developed, our mind already has tremendous control of one thing: our behavior. Our thoughts sooner or later lead to our actions.


Heart, Self-Control, Thoughts Prov. 4:23; Rom. 13:14; James 1:14-15



According to an October 29,1994, story from the Reuters news agency a Chinese woman named Zhang Meihua began to suffer mysterious symptoms when she turned twenty. She was losing the ability to nimbly move her legs and arms. Doctors could not find the cause, and the symptoms continued.


Two decades passed, and Zhang began to also suffer from chronic headaches. Again she sought help from the doctors. This time a CAT scan and an X ray found the source of the woman's mysterious symptoms. A rusty pin was lodged in her head. The head of the pin was outside the skull, and the shaft penetrated into her brain. Doctors performed surgery and successfully extracted the pin.


The Xinhua news agency reported the doctors expressed amazement that the woman "could live for so long a time with a rusty pin stuck in her brain." After noting the position of the pin in her skull, they speculated that the pin had entered her skull sometime soon after birth and before her skull had hardened. Zhang, now fully recovered, said she "had no memory of being pierced by a pin in the head."


Like the rusty pin in that woman's brain, unwholesome thoughts, bad attitudes, and painful memories can lodge in our minds and cause chronic problems. God tells us to renew our minds.


Attitudes, Health, Thoughts Rom. 12:1-2; Phil. 4:8-9



FROM  THE  BOOK:  "SWINDOLL'S  ULTIMATE  BOOK  OF  ILLUSTRATIONS  AND  QUOTES"


MATURITY


Under roman law there was a time for the coming of age of a son. But the age when this took place was not fixed as one might assume. Rather, the father had the discretion in setting the time of his son's maturity. A Roman child became an adult at the sacred family festival known as the Liberalia held annually on the seventeenth of March. At this time, the child was formally acknowledged as the son and heir by his father, and he received the plain toga adults wore in place of the toga with a narrow purple band at the foot of it which children wore. He was then conducted by his friends and relations down to the forum and formally introduced to public life. Lloyd Douglas gave us a glimpse of the moving nature of this moment as he described the coming of age of Marcellus in the opening pages of his book The Robe.


How far you go in life depends on your being tender with the young, patient with the old, sympathetic with the striving, tolerant with the weak and the strong, because someday in life you will have been all of these.


—George Washington Carver


IF


If you can keep your head when all about you 

Are losing theirs and blaming it on you;

If you can trust yourself when all men doubt you, 

But make allowance for their doubting too;

If you can wait and not be tired by waiting, 

Or, being lied about, don't deal in lies, 

Or, being hated, don't give way to hating, 

And yet don't look too good, nor talk too wise;


If you can dream—and not make dreams your master;

If you can think—and not make thoughts your aim; 

If you can meet with triumph and disaster

And treat those two impostors just the same;

If you can bear to hear the truth you've spoken

Twisted by knaves to make a trap for fools, 

Or watch the things you gave your life to, broken; 

And stoop and build 'em up with wornout tools;


If you can make one heap of all your winnings,

And risk it on one turn of pitch-and-toss,

And lose, and start again at your beginnings

And never breathe a word about your loss; 

If you can force your heart and nerve and sinew 

To serve your turn long after they are gone,

And so hold on when there is nothing in you

Except the Will which says to them: "Hold on";


If you can talk with crowds and keep your virtue,

Or walk with kings—nor lose the common touch;

If neither foes nor loving friends can hurt you; 

If all men count with you, but none too much; 

If you can fill the unforgiving minute

With sixty seconds' worth of distance run—

Yours is the Earth and everything that's in it,

 And—which is more—you'll be a Man, my son!


----Rudyard Kipling, quoted in Hazel Felleman, The Best Loved Poems of the American People


After a While


After a while you learn the subtle difference between

holding a hand and chaining a soul, 

and you learn that love doesn't mean leaning

and company doesn't mean security.


After a while you begin to learn that kisses aren't contracts

and presents aren't promises,

and you begin to accept your defeats

with your head up and your eyes open,

with the grace of an adult, not the grief of a child.


After a while you learn to build your roads on today because

tomorrow's grounds are too uncertain for plans.

After a while you learn that even sunshine burns 

if you get too much. So plant your own garden

and decorate your own soil instead of waiting

for someone to bring you flowers. 

And you learn that you really can endure,

….that you really are strong,

….and you really do have worth.


---Anonymous

……


Maturity begins to grow when you can sense your concern for others outweighing your concern for yourself.

—John McNaughton, quoted in Lloyd Cory, Quote Unquote


One of the marks of maturity is the ability to disagree without becoming disagreeable.

—Charles R. Swindoll, The Grace Awakening


Maturity is the ability to do a job whether supervised or not; finish it once started; carry money without spending it; and... bear an injustice without wanting to get even.

—Fred Cook, quoted in Lloyd Cory, Quote Unquote


Maturity proceeds through four stages: help me, tell me, show me, follow me.

……


What does it mean to be grown up? It means such things as being fully developed, having marks of wisdom, not just knowledge; the self-discipline and commitment of an authentic walk with Christ seven days a week; the determination to obey God and to submit to the truth of His Word at any cost; the ability to nourish myself as an individual believer in God's Word; the compassion to reach out and care for other people whose needs are different from my own; the willingness to share in the responsibilities of the household—all of the above with an attitude of a contagious, positive spirit.


We're not unlike the thirteen-year-old kid that's six feet, ten inches in junior high school, whose dad says to him one day, "Son, I think you maybe ought to think about basketball." He has the height for it, but there's not a person who would question his lack of maturity for it. Put him on the same court with Moses Malone and he'd get his lunch eaten. Malone loves that kind of person on the court with him. Why? Not because the kid can't match him in height, but he hasn't the resiliency. He hasn't the maturity. He needs to do what? He needs to grow up. Even if he never grows another inch he has plenty of height to play in any pro basketball team. What he needs is to grow up.

……


Maturity  is  moving  from  soft  skin-tough  heart  to  tough  skin-soft  heart

……



FROM  THE  BOOK:  "STORIES.  ILLUSTRATIONS,  AND  QUOTES"



Mind



Someone Once Said 


The most important things in life are the thoughts you choose to think.—Marcus Aurelius


I think, therefore I am.—Decartes


We are what we think. All that we are arises with our thoughts. With our thoughts, we make the world.—Buddha


It doubtless is true that people become what they think about.—Gary R. Collins


All mortals tend to turn into the thing they are pretending to be.—C. S. Lewis


If I knew what you think, I would know what you are. Our thoughts make us what we are.—Dale Carnegie


A man is what he thinks about all day long.—Ralph Waldo Emerson


Our life is what our thoughts make it.—Marcus Aurelius


For as he thinks in his heart, so is he.—Proverbs 23:7



The Battleground


Every temptation comes to us via our thoughts.—Erwin Lutzer


The mind of man is the battleground on which every moral and spiritual battle is fought.— J. Oswald Sanders


Our defeat or victory begins with what we think, and if we guard our thoughts we shall not have much trouble anywhere else along the line.—Vance Havner


Self-control is primarily mind-control—John Stott


Every kidnapping was once a thought. Every extramarital affair was first a fantasy.— Leslie Flynn


It is not enough to have a good mind; the main thing is to use it well.—Descartes


For 2,400 years, ever since Hippocrates located the seat of the intellect inside the skull, the mind has been forced to admit that its greatest achievements, its loftiest thoughts, its deepest emotions all arise from something with the consistency of Jell-O and the color of day-old slush.—Newsweek


A bookstore is one of the only pieces of evidence we have that people are still thinking.— Jerry Seinfeld

……


Depression and the Mind


In his book Learned Optimism, Professor Martin Seligman makes a case for considering depression as arising, not from misplaced chemicals or lingering childhood trauma, but from negative thinking. Summarizing the research of Joseph Wolpe and Tim Beck, Seligman explained how cognitive therapy began to be considered a treatment for mental illness.


"Depression is nothing more than its symptoms," writes Seligman. "It is caused by conscious negative thoughts. There is no deep underlying disorder to be rooted out: not unresolved childhood conflicts, not our unconscious anger, and not even our brain chemistry. Emotion comes directly from what we think: Think 'I am in danger' and you feel anxiety. Think 'I am being trespassed against' and you feel anger. Think 'loss' and you feel sadness. 


"Depression results from lifelong habits of conscious thought. If we change these habits of thought, we will cure depression."



Martin Luther King, Jr's Seat


In the Autobiography of Martin Luther King, Jr., Dr. King tells of growing up in Atlanta, Georgia:


I remember another experience I used to have in Atlanta. I went to high school on the other side of town—to the Booker T. Washington High School. I had to get the bus in what was known as the Fourth Ward and ride over to the West Side. In those days, rigid patterns of segregation existed on the buses, so that Negroes had to sit in the backs of buses. Whites were seated in the front, and often if whites didn't get on the buses, those seats were still reserved for whites only, so Negroes had to stand over empty seats. I would end up having to go to the back of that bus with my body, but every time I got on that bus I left my mind up on the front seat. And I said to myself, "One of these days, I'm going to put my body up there where my mind is."

And he did.

Our bodies always end up where our minds are.

……


Spurgeon's Confession


Charles Spurgeon once made a remarkably honest confession to his congregation. In a sermon entitled "The Power of the Holy Ghost," he said: I hope that my will is managed by Divine Grace. But I am afraid my imagination is not at times. Those who have a fair share of imagination know what a difficult thing it is to control. You cannot restrain it.... My imagination has taken me down to the vilest kennels and sewers of earth. It has given me thoughts so dreadful that, while I could not avoid them, yet I was thoroughly horrified by them. These thoughts will come; and when I feel in the holiest frame, the most devoted to God, and the most earnest in-prayer, it often happens that that is the very time when the plague breaks out the worst.

……


Garbage


Leslie Flynn tells of a mother who was peeling vegetables for a salad when her daughter, home from college, casually mentioned she was going to a questionable movie that evening. The mother suddenly picked up a handful of garbage and threw it in the salad. "Mother!" said the shocked girl. "You're putting garbage in the salad."

"I know," replied the mother, "but I thought that if you didn't mind garbage in your mind, you certainly wouldn't mind a little in your stomach."

……


The Power of Suggestion


Franz Anton Mesmer was the talk of Paris in the 1780s. In spite of his training as a physician, he held the unorthodox view that a mysterious magnetic power permeates the universe and resides in human bodies. Treatment of disease, he proposed, could best be done by using magnetic forces from the environment to restore the patient's "magnetic equilibrium." Such view put Mesmer into conflict with the medical profession in his native Vienna, but laypeople were intrigued with the theory….


(A Word on Words: You are not what you think you are, but what you think, you are.

—NORMAN VINCENT PEALE)


When the doctor moved to France, his reputation preceded him and soon patients were flocking to experience magnetic treatments.


It wasn't easy to treat so many people on a one-to-one basis, so Mesmer developed a group technique. As many as thirty people would come at a time and sit around a large wooden tub known as a "baquet." The baquet was filled with water, ground glass, iron filings, and long metal rods that extended from the tub and were grabbed at one end by the patients. According to Mesmer, the magnetic fluid in the baquet somehow came to the people through the rods and led to all kinds of physical cures.


Mesmer did what he could to make the healing sessions impressive and emotionally powerful. Soft music played in the background. The room was dimly lit and thickly draped. Mesmer himself demanded silence when he entered the room. Often he wore a long flowing lilac silk robe, and walked about, touching the afflicted body parts with a long iron wand and making magnetic "mesmeric passes" as he waved his free hand through the air.


A few people had no response to this dramatic treatment, but many thought they felt forces moving through their bodies, and some went into prolonged convulsions. These involved jerking of the body, apparent dreaminess or stupor, and sometimes piercing cries. Mesmer's followers called this experience "the crisis" and claimed that it brought great healing.


But King Louis XVI wasn't so easily convinced and undoubtedly His Majesty's interest in Mesmer was sparked by secret reports that some mesmerites had radical political ideas. To investigate, the king appointed a Royal Commission and declared that it would be chaired by the American ambassador to France, a man named Benjamin Franklin.


The commissioners went to work with enthusiasm, conducting experiments and interviewing Mesmer's patients. After careful study, it was concluded that body magnetism did not exist, that the baquet fluid had no power, and that convulsions and proclaimed cures came as a result of the creative imagination of Mesmer and his highly suggestible followers. Shortly after the report was issued, Mesmer left France and the mesmerites went underground, but a half-century later mesmerism re-emerged in a more sophisticated form and with a new name—hypnosis.

……


As a Man Thinks 


One of history's sharpest minds belonged to Thomas Edison, the great inventor. Despite only three months of formal schooling, Edison and his inventions changed the world forever.


His secret? "One percent inspiration and 99 percent perspiration," as he put it; and he proved his definition by working days at a time, obsessed with his projects, neglecting family and friends, and stopping only for short catnaps. Failure never seemed to discourage him. When about ten thousand experiments with a storage battery failed to produce results, a friend tried to console him. "Why, I have not failed," Edison quipped. "I've just found 10,000 ways that won't work."


Of all his inventions, perhaps the most famous is the electric light. He devised the prototype, then spent two years looking for the right filament, sending associates to the jungles of the Amazon and to the forests of Japan. He even tried strands of red hair from a friend's beard. Finally he utilized carbonized thread, and it worked! The world gained electric lights.


Our light bulbs today have three parts to them. There is the glass itself—the bulb surrounding the filament. Inside the bulb is a mixture of gases, commonly argon and nitrogen. Finally, in the very center of the bulb, is the filament. Most filaments today are made of a very tough metal, and when electricity flows through them, they become very hot—about 4,500 degrees—making them glow and give off light.


Light bulbs bear a fascinating resemblance to you and me. There is the outside covering, the glass bulb, the body—the part people see. Inside, like invisible gases within the bulb, are our personalities. And at the very center of it all is that part of us that glows and enlightens—the human mind.


The mind is the sum and substance, the axis and pivot, of our existence. It is the base of operations, the core of our humanity. Our minds are the most important things about us, and our lives are simply the overflow of our thoughts.


Dale Carnegie was once asked on a radio program, "What is the biggest lesson you have ever learned?" He quickly replied, "By far the most vital lesson I have ever learned is the importance of what we think. If I knew what you think, I would know what you are. Our thoughts make us what we are. Our mental attitude is the X-factor that determines our fate. Emerson said: "A man is what he thinks about all day long. How could he possibly be anything else?"


Why? An old maxim states: "Thoughts produce acts, acts produce habits, and habits produce character." The Roman philosopher Marcus Aurelius said, "Our life is what our thoughts make it." Or as the Bible puts it, "For as he thinks in his heart, so is he." (Proverbs 23:7)

……


The Cauliflower Jewel


Each of us owns a jewel far more valuable than any displayed in the window of Carrier's or Tiffany's. It's a three-pound blob of gray pulp resembling a rotting cauliflower.

Unimpressed?


This jewel is the most incredible creation in God's universe, a fabulous, living supercomputer with unfathomable circuitry and unimaginable complexity. It is the human mind—a collection of billions of neurons, each as complex as a small computer. Imagine having 100 billion computers inside your skull!


Each of these neurons consists of a central nerve-cell core attached to a long tail and several thousand wispy dendrites. These dendrites reach out to make contact with other dendrites, and the number of connection points between these dendrites is perhaps one quadrillion in every human brain. According to one writer, the number of connections within one human brain rivals the number of stars and galaxies in all the universe.


That's not all, for each of these connection points is itself a marvel of complexity. The dendrites don't actually touch each other, but they efficiently and rapidly pass messages to each other through the form of electrical and chemical impulses in a series of processes that takes less than one-thousandth of a second.


"All of this is so complex," said one scientist, "that the brain cannot even begin to comprehend its own complexity."

What a jewel!

……


I Was Just Thinking About You


When Harry Truman became president, he worried about losing touch with common, everyday Americans, so he would often go out and be among them. Those were in simpler days when the President could take a walk like everyone else. One evening, Truman decided to take a walk down to the Memorial Bridge on the Potomac River. When there, he became curious about the mechanism that raised and lowered the middle span of the bridge. He made his way across the cat walks and through the inner workings of the bridge, and suddenly he came upon the bridge tender, eating his evening supper out of a tin bucket.


The man showed absolutely no surprise when he looked up and saw the best-known and most powerful man in the world. He just swallowed his food, wiped his mouth, smiled, and said, "You know, Mr. President, I was just thinking of you."


It was a greeting that Truman adored and never forgot.


Wouldn't it, be wonderful, if Jesus Christ were to suddenly appear before us physically or come suddenly in the cloud, if we could say, "You know, Lord, I was just thinking of you."

……


The Harbor


The Bible describes our minds by using the figure of a ship looking for a harbor. Though you may be unable to keep disease-ridden ships from sailing back and forth on the ocean, you can refuse them docking privileges in the harbor of your mind.

       

*Jeremiah 4:14 says, "How long will you harbor your evil thoughts?" (NLT)

*Deuteronomy 15:9 says, "Be careful not to harbor this wicked thought." (NIV)

*Job talks about those who harbor resentment in their hearts.

*The Psalmist talks about those who harbor malice in the minds.

*James talks about those who allow bitter envy and selfish ambition to harbor within them.

*Jesus conveyed the same basic idea when asking, "Why do you entertain evil thoughts in your minds?" (Matthew 9:4- NIV)

*Paul had the same thought in mind when he said, "Clothe yourselves with the Lord Jesus Christ, and do not think about how to gratify the desires of the sinful nature." (Romans 13:14—NIV)

……


From Charles Spurgeon's John Ploughman


Some will say they cannot help having bad thoughts; that may be, but the question is, do they hate them or not? Vain thoughts will knock at the door, but we must not open to them. Though sinful thoughts rise, they must not reign. He who turns a morsel over and over in his mouth, does so because he likes the favor, and he who meditates upon evil, loves it, and is ripe to commit it. Snails leave their slime behind them, and so do vain thoughts.


Good thoughts are blessed guests, and should be heartily welcomed, well fed, and much sought after. Like rose leaves, they give out a sweet smell if laid up in the jar of memory. They cannot be too much cultivated; they are a crop which enriches the soil.

……


Pepsi or Seven-Up?


Suppose you have a sponge and a pitcher of Pepsi Cola. If you dip your sponge into Pepsi and squeeze it, what's going to come out? Seven-up? No, when you squeeze a sponge soaked in Pepsi, Pepsi is going to gush out of it.


If you saturate your mind with questionable movies, videos, magazines, novels, music, and entertainments, do you think that holiness and happiness and godliness will flow out?

……


Glass Hives


When I was child my parents took me to the Tennessee Valley Fair to ride the rides and see the exhibits. One of the most interesting displays was the honeybees in glass hives. There appeared to be thousands of bees, all of them hustling and bustling in frantic activity beneath the pane of glass that covered their colony. The bee keeper showed us the queen and explained about the workers, the guards, and the drones, every one of them oblivious to the fact that their every move was being observed by a higher intelligence.


In the same way, our heads, are like glass hives and God sees every hustling, bustling thought buzzing through our brains. None are hidden from him.


1 Chronicles 28:9—The Lord searches all hearts and understands all the intents of the thoughts.


Psalm 7:9—The righteous God tests the hearts and minds.


Psalm 94:11—The Lord knows the thoughts of man.


Psalm 139:1—O Lord, You have searched me and known me. You know my sitting down and my rising up; You understand my thought afar off.


Jeremiah 11:20—O Lord of hosts, You who judge righteously, testing the mind and the heart. . . .


Jeremiah 12:3—But You, O Lord, know me; You have seen me, and You have tested my heart toward you.


Jeremiah 17:9—The heart is [can be] deceiful above all things, and desperately wicked; who can know it? I, the Lord, search the heart, I test the mind. . . .


Jeremiah 20:12—O Lord of hosts, You who test the righteous and see the mind and heart. . .


Ezekiel 11:5—Thus says the Lord:... I know the things that come into your mind....


Revelation 2:23—I am He who searches the minds and hearts.


Hebrews 4:12-13—For the word of God is living and powerful, and sharper than any two-edged sword, piercing even to the division of soul and spirit, and of joints and marrow, and is a discerner of the thoughts and intents of the heart. And there is no creature hidden from His sight, but all things are naked and open to the eyes of Him to whom we must give account.


Matthew 12:25—But Jesus knew their thoughts. . . .

……


FROM  THE  BOOK: "1001  QUOTES,  ILLUSTRATIONS  AND  HUMOROUS  STORIES"


Maturity




In First Things First, A. Roger Merrill tells of a business consultant who decided to landscape his grounds. He hired a woman with a doctorate in horticulture who was extremely knowledgeable. Because the business consultant was very busy and traveled a lot, he kept emphasizing to her the need to create his garden in a way that would require little or no maintenance on his part. He insisted on automatic sprinklers and other labor-saving devices.


Finally she stopped and said, "There's one thing you need to deal with before we go any further. If there's no gardener, there's no garden!"


There are no labor-saving devices for growing a garden of spiritual virtue. Becoming a person of spiritual fruitfulness requires time, attention, and care.


Bill Norman (Discipleship, Spiritual Growth)

………………..


OH  THE  GREAT  MIND  OF  MAN;  GOD  MADE  IT!  BUT  THE  BIBLE  SAYS  "THERE  IS  A  SPIRIT  IN  MAN"  -  THE  MIND,  THE  BRAIN,  HAS  A  PART  TO  IT  THAT  CANNOT  BE  SEEN,  IT  IS  INVISIBLE,  GIVEN  BY  GOD.  BOTH  FIT  TOGETHER  TO  MAKE  THE  MIND  OF  MAN  HUGELY,  MASSIVELY  GREATER  THAN  ANY  MIND  OF  ANY  OTHER  CREATURE  ON  EARTH.  I  HAVE  A  FULL  STUDY  ON  THIS  WEBSITE  CALLED  "THE  SPIRIT  IN  MAN"  -  YOU  NEED  TO  STUDY  THAT  STUDY.


BUT  TO  BE  A  CHILD  OF  THE  MOST  HIGH  GOD  IN  HEAVEN,  YOU  HAVE  TO  OBTAIN  GOD'S  MIND,  HIS  NATURE,  HIS  SPIRIT  -  THE  HOLY  SPIRIT  OF  GOD.


YOU  OBTAIN  IT  AS  PETER  SAID  IN  HIS  SERMON  ON  THE  DAY  OF  PENTECOST  IN  ACTS  2.  YOU  MUST  COME  TO  REPENTANCE  AND  BAPTISM  -  THEN  YOU  CAN  RECEIVE  THE  GIFT  OF  THE  HOLY  SPIRIT.  THERE  ARE  IN-DEPTH  STUDIES  ON  THIS  WEBSITE  ON  REPENTANCE  AND  BAPTISM.


THIS  PENTECOST  DAY  PICTURES  THE  DAY  IN  ACTS  2,  WHEN  THE  SPIRIT  OF  GOD  CAME  TO  EARTH,  FOR  HUMAN  BEING,  AS  NEVER  BEFORE  GIVEN;  TO  UNITE  WITH  THE  SPIRIT  IN  MAN,  AND  MAKE  A  CHILD  OF  GOD,  DIFFERENT  THAN  EVER  IN  THE  PAST  AGES.  BEFORE  THAT  TIME,  THE  SPIRIT  GUIDED,  INFLUENCED  MEN  AND  WOMEN,  BUT  IT  WAS  NOT  A  PART  OF  THEM  AS  IT  IS  UNDER  THE  NEW  COVENANT  TERMS  AND  AGREEMENT.  TODAY  GOD  THE  FATHER  AND  CHRIST  JESUS  HIS  SON,  CAN  COME  AND  LIVE  WITHIN  THE  CHRISTIAN,  UNITED  WITH  THE  MIND  OF  MANKIND,  IN  A  VERY  PERSONAL  AND  DIRECT  AND  UNITED  WAY,  VIA  THE  HOLY  SPIRIT.


FROM  THE  DAY  OF  PENTECOST  IN  ACTS  2,  THE  VERY  MIND  OF  CHRIST [THAT  IS  ALSO  THE  MIND  OF  THE  FATHER]  CAN  BE  IN  THE  DISCIPLES  OF  CHRIST.


AND  SO  IT  IS  THAT  THE  APOSTLE  PAUL  WAS  INSPIRED  TO  SAY,  "LET  THIS  MIND  BE  IN  YOU,  THAT  WAS  IN  CHRIST  JESUS."


MY  PRAYER  FOR  YOU  IS  THAT  INDEED  THIS  WILL  BE  A REALITY  IN  YOUR  LIFE,  AND  SO  YOU  WILL  BE  PART  OF  THE  FISRT-FRUITS  OF  GOD;  PART  OF  THE  FIRST  RESURRECTION  OF  SAINTS,  AT  THE  COMING  OF  OUR  LORD  AND  SAVIOR.


Keith  Hunt