Keith Hunt - CATHOLIC/PROTESTANT HELL Restitution of All
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Catholic/Protestant "suffering" for Eternity in Hell

Yes, it is STILL being Taught!

PAINFUL BURNING FOREVER "HELL" AS TAUGHT BY 
THE ROMAN CATHOLIC AND PROTESTANT CHURCHES


From the book "The Popular Encyclopedia of Bible Prophecy"

by Tim Lahaye and Ed Hindsoln

published 2004


This is a very recent published book as I write in the year 2008.
We will see that just about nothing has changed in the millennium
plus teaching, concerning the Roman Catholic and Protestant
teaching that God is SO HATEFUL, SO REVENGEFUL, SO MERCILESS, SO
CALLOUS, THAT HE WILL, WITH PAIN AND SUFFERING, PUT PEOPLE WHO
ARE UNREPENTANT SINNERS, INTO A HELL, THAT WILL GIVE THEM PAIN
AND TORMENT FOR ***ALL ETERNITY***!!!!   Keith Hunt






     The OLD AND New Testament use 18 different words and figures
to describe the doctrine of hell. Each of these contributes
something to our understanding of the complete biblical teaching
concerning hell. Even with these 18 descriptions of hell, our
knowledge of this place necessarily remains limited. God, Creator
of mankind, understands the psychological limit to man's ability
to comprehend horror. Strong (p.1033) refers to some of the 18
descriptions:

(This is saying it is like the doctrine of the "Trinity" - you
just cannot understand it, yet it is STILL taught as truth -
Keith Hunt)

     The final state of the wicked is described under the figures
of eternal fire (Matt.25:41); the pit of the abyss (Rev.9:2,11);
outer darkness (Matt.8:12); torment (Rev.14:10-11); eternal
punishment (Matt.25:46); wrath of God (Rom.2:5); second death
(Rev.21:8); eternal destruction from the Face of the Lord (2
Thess.1:9); eternal sin (Mark 3:29).

(All of these expression above are fully explained in other
studies on this Website. The Caths (Catholic) and Prots
(Protestants) will read into those verses that "hell" is a place
where sinners burn in pain and anguish for all eternity - Keith
Hunt)

     The fact that these and other descriptions of hell are
graphic does not mean they are unreal. They may also represent
other truths, but we have no biblical reason for disputing a
literal interpretation of them.

(And they are literal verses meaning what they say, but they do
not say what the Cath/Prots like them to say - Keith Hunt)


BIBLICAL TERMS

1. Sheol. The derivation of the Hebrew term sheol is disputed
among linguists, and we cannot be dogmatic on linguistic evidence
alone, although most scholars prefer the meaning of "hollow" or
"deep" place.
Some of the confusion over the meaning of "Sheol" is due to the
fact that it often appears to refer merely to the grave, and at
other times it refers to an existence, either positive or
negative, after death. In part, this is due to theological rather
than grammatical assumptions on the part of the biblical writers.
Shedd (p.34) suggests, "Sheol signifies the 'grave,' to which all
men, the good and evil alike, go down. That Sheol should have the
two significations of hell and the grave, is explained by the
connection between physical death and eternal retribution."
Summarizing the biblical usage of this term, Pentecost (p.556)
notes, "The first is Sheol, which is used sixty-five times in the
Old Testament translated "hell" thirty-one times (cf. Deut.
32:22; Ps.9:17; 18:5; Isa.14:9), "gave" thirty-one times (cf. I
Sam. 2:6; Job 7:9; 14:13), and "pit," three times (cf. Num.
16:30,33; Job 17:16). This was the Old Testament word for the
abode of the dead. It was presented, not just as a state Of
existence, but as a place of conscious existence (Deut.18:11; 1
Sam.28:11-15; Isa.14:9). God was sovereign over it (Deut.32:12;
Job 26:6). It was regarded as temporary and the righteous
anticipated the resurrection out of it into the millennial age
(Job 14:13-14; 19:25, 2;; Ps.16:9-11; 17:15; 49:15; 73:24).

(For a full in-depth study of this word see the study "Death -
then What?" on this Website. Deut.18:11 is talking about people
who can communicate with the demon world, not dead people. 1
Sam.28 and Samuele is about a demon appearing as Samuele, it is
not a contradiction of the Bible teaching on death. Isa.14:9 is
concerning the resurrection of the dead, not the dead continuing
to live after they die - Keith Hunt)


2. Hordes. The translators of the ( Greek Septuagint generally
used the word hades when translating sheol. Hades was also the
designation of the underworld in (Greek thought. Concerning the
relation between these two words, Innes (p.518) notes, "The (Gk.
hades represents the underworld, or realm of the dead, in the
classics. In the LXX [Septuagint] it almost always renders sheol,
and in the New Testament hades has an exclusively negative
emphasis. It is used only to describe the place of retribution
for the wicked."
     The key passage in the New Testament describing Hades is
Luke 16:19-31. While some attempt to dismiss this account as a
parable, Ironside (p.510) observes:
"There was a certain rich man." Was there, or was there not? He
definitely declared that there was. He did not intro-
duce the story by saying, "Hear a parable," as on some other
occasions; neither did He say, "The kingdom is as if there were a
certain rich man and a poor beggar," or some similar language.
But in the clearest, most definite way He declared, "There was a
certain rich man."
     If the rich man was real, then so is hell. The rich man went
to hades at death and was tormented in real flames (Luke 16:24).
The punishment of hades includes (1) burning, (2) separation and
loneliness, (;) conviction by memory, (4) thirst, (5) falling,
and(6) stench. The rich man could look across "a great gulf
fixed" (Luke 16:26 KJV) and see where the saved were located.
However, Scripture is silent as to whether the saved could see
the torment of the unsaved. We do know that the rich plan could
not escape his torment.
     The presence of the beggar in the relative proximity of the
rich man suggests that originally both hades and paradise, or
Abraham's bosom, were in the same place. At his death, Christ
descended "into the lower parts of the earth" and "led captivity
captive." He later ascended from that place (Ephesians 4:8-10).
     Many Commentators believe paradise was, at that time,
released from the regions of hades and taken to the third heaven.

(Paradise "released from hades" and taken to heaven? What a
strange doctrine some people come up with, I just shake my head,
some "theology" is truly for the birds, no wonder unbelievers
often laugh at Christianity. As for Christ taking captive
captivity, it is all explained in the NT Bible Story under the
expounding of the book of Ephesians. And as for the "Rich man and
Lazarus" - oh, yes, the Caths/Prots LOVE to use this as their
teaching that sinners will fry and cry forever in the flames
of hell. The story IS TRUE, it does mean what it says, BUT the
Caths/Prots do not let it say what it says. You need to go to my
study on this Website called "The Rich man and Lazarus" and learn
what the truth of the matter is - Keith Hunt)


3. Tartaros. Another biblical term describing hell is tartartos
(Greek). It occurs (only once in Scripture, and even there it is
technically a related verb rather than the noun itself. Peter
writes that God did not spare the angels that sinned, but "cast
them down to hell" (2 Peter 2:4). Most agree the verb is based on
a Greek noun describing the lowest of the nine levels of hell in 
Greek thought. God's punishment upon the fallen angels was such
that He cast them to "the very bottom of hell."

(The truth of God is not understood by what the "Greeks" thought
or taught. I explain 2 Peter 2:4 in the NT Bible Story under the
Epistles of Peter - Keith Hunt)

4. Gehenna. A fourth biblical term translated "hell" is gehenna
(Greek). this is the most severe word for hell in Scripture and
one used almost exclusively by Jesus. Because of the severity of
some of the Statements and images concerning gehenna, those who
argue against the existence of a literal hell, such as the
Jehovah's Witnesses, are most likely to dispute the meaning of
this term. The New Testament, however, describes hell by
referring to a place in the valley of Hinnom where, in earlier
days, human sacrifices were offered (2 Chronicles 33:6; Jeremiah
7:31). It is the name in Scripture for the lake of fire, the
final and eternal abode of the lost (Revelation 19:20;
20:10,14-15).
     The use of gehenna in the New Testament makes it clear that
the word does not refer merely to a historical valley outside of
Jerusalem, a garbage dump in that day. This term is associated
with eternal fire, punishment, and torment. Gehenna is the place
of eternal retribution, the final abode of the unsaved. All of
the descriptions emphasizing the repulsiveness of hell -
including the worm, fire, and gnashing of teeth - are
descriptions of gehenna. Scripture probably does not describe the
full horror of gehenna because of man's inability
psychologically, mentally, and spiritually to comprehend such a
place.

(The last sentence is a nice and easy way to get around the truth
of the subject, just say (like they do with the "Trinity"
teaching) "oh, it is not possible for us to understand it." Hence
you can read into words like "gehenna" and continue to teach that
sinners will live forever in a state of being burned alive,
screaming and in pain, for all eternity. The truth of "gehenna"
is fully explained in "Death - then What" and in other studies on
this Website concerning death, resurrection, immortal soul, and
the punishment of the un-repented sinners - Keith Hunt)


5. Retribution. Though the term retribution is absent in the KJV,
the idea of retribution is fundamental to our understanding of
God. The biblical ideas of punishment, vengeance, and wrath all
suggest retribution as part of the judgment on sin. It is the
judicial result of God's anger and wrath.
     In addition, retribution in hell exists because the natural
consequence of sin is destruction (see Proverbs 14:12; 16:25;
Matthew 7:13; Romans 5:12). The corrupting nature of sin destroys
all that it contacts. This does not minimize in any way the
concept of divine wrath but rather identifies another of the
sources of retribution. In one sense, hell is hell because it is
the place where sin is unrestrained in its destructive passion.

(And so, to the Caths/Prots hell is painfully tormenting sinners
for all eternity - Keith Hunt)


6. Prison. On two occasions the Scriptures use the word "prison"
in an apparent reference to hell (1 Peter 3:19; Revelation 20:7).
Under Jewish law, imprisonment was not part of the penal code
except when a prisoner found guilty was held until the execution
of his sentence. Apparently, spirits in prison are awaiting a
later execution of sentence. "Prison," therefore, should be
properly applied to hades rather than gehenna. Thus, "hell" is
the equivalent to being held in jail while awaiting trial and
sentencing to the penitentiary.

(And this is referring to fallen angels now called demons. 
1 Peter 3:19 is fully explained under the epistles of Peter in the
NT Bible Story - Keith Hunt)


7. Chains. The image of chains is yet another biblical
description of hell. In the Scriptures, chains appear to be
reserved for angelic beings (2 Peter 2:4; Jude G; Revelation
20:1). The third reference is to Satan being bound with a chain
while he is locked in the abyss for l000 years. This indicates
that God is supreme even over satanic regions.


8. Stripes. Emphasizing the idea of degrees of punishment in
hell, Jesus used the image of "stripes" to describe the judgment
to come (Luke 12:48). Whatever else may be implied by Jesus'
reference to stripes with reference to hell, it is certain He
intended to emphasize the existence of degrees of punishment in
hell. As not all sinners have equal light, nor have they engaged
in their sin with equal intensity, so will the degree of
suffering differ in hell. This does not in any way minimize the
reality of suffering in hell. It will be of little comfort to one
experiencing "few stripes" to know that somewhere else in hell,
another is receiving many stripes.

(Once more how the Caths/Prots love to use this one for their
"everlasting torment" of sinners by God, in some painfully never-
ending fire. The CONTEXT of Luke 12:48 is the SECOND COMING of
Christ, when he shall punish the wicked of the nations who are
destroying the earth. He tells His disciples to WATCH, be ready
spiritually at all times, for THE DAY of His coming will be
unknown. The servant who knew better and did not prepare himself
spiritually, but was shall we say "lukewarm" will be punished
with greater judgement - his reward will be less, or as Jesus put
it here, with more stripes (Paul put it a different way in 1
Cor.3:9-15 - suffer loss by degrees - see the NT Bible Story
under Corinthians for the full explanation). At Christ's coming,
those who did NOT know better - who were left in ignorance - as
to God's will - shall be dealt with as with more mercy or as
Jesus said here, with fewer stripes. Indeed, to those given much,
then much is expected, to those not given anything, little or
nothing will be expected, and God being no respecter of persons
will at the coming of Christ judge people accordingly - Keith
Hunt)

9. Weeping and gnashing of teeth. On several occasions Jesus used
the expression "weeping and gnashing of teeth" to describe the
personal anguish of individuals in hell (Matthew 8:12; 13:42,50;
22:13; 24:51; 25:30; Luke 13:28). The word "gnashing" is used to
speak of grinding or striking together ones teeth in rage, pain,
or misery of disappointment. In the Old Testament it represents
rage, anger, and hatred. This expression seems to suggest the
sorrow in hell will be caused by a sense of loss, anger, and
despair.

(The truth of the matter is very simple, when those left on the
outside of the Kingdom looking in, will see what they have missed out
on, they will weep and gnash their teeth, as they face the lake
of fire and the second death. All explained in detail in the
subjects of "death" and "hell" on this Website - Keith Hunt)


10. Abyss or bottomless pit. Seven times in the final book of the
Bible, John describes hell as a "bottomless pit" (9:1-2,11; 11:7;
17:8; 20:1,3). In each case the pit is closely associated with
demons, and they are generally being released from or confined to
the pit. The Old Testament also uses the image of a pit to refer
to the abode of the wicked dead. The word abyss refers to that
which is deep and from which there is no escape.

(There will indeed be no escape form the "pit" of restraiment and
punishment for the demons in the finality of it all - Keith Hunt)


11. Outer darkness. Another image of hell used by Christ was that
of "darkness." In the eschatology of the New Testament, heaven is
portrayed as a bright, well-lighted place. To be exiled from
heaven was to be placed in outer darkness. Jesus' use of the word
'skotia' to describe this place suggests extreme darkness as
opposed to the gloominess of a cloudy or foggy day.

(To be punished with everlasting death is indeed utter darkness,
and for the demons to be cast away into the blackness of the
universe, as seems to be their punishment [see Jude 13 and 1
Cor.6:3] darkness with no one to deceive or possess will be
darkness indeed - Keith Hunt)


12. Destruction. On one occasion Paul used the expression
"everlasting destruction from the presence of the Lord" (2
Thessalonians 1:9) to describe hell. Although "destroyer" is one
of the many titles of Satan (see Revelation 9:11), Paul alone
specifically identifies hell as the place of destruction. The
idea was not foreign to Jewish thought and was believed to be the
lot of the wicked. Paul, in this context, suggests it is the
destiny of "them that know not God, and that obey not the gospel
of our Lord Jesus Christ" (2 Thessalonians 1:8).

(And yes, it is DESTRUCTION for the un-repented sinner, NOT
everlasting life in some fire that is eternal, and with some kind
of pain and torture for all eternity - Keith Hunt)


13. Torments. Hell is also described as a place of torment (Luke
16:23,28). Of the various words for suffering in the New
Testament, this one may he the most severe. It denotes pain and
anguish as extreme forms of human suffering, as is illustrated by
the rich mall who described hades as "a place of torments" (Luke
16:28).

(Back again the Caths/Prots go to the Rich man and Lazarus, to
emphasize their teaching that sinners will for all eternity
suffer pain and anguish and torment - Keith Hunt)


14. Worm. Isaiah and Jesus both used the image of an undying worm
in their descriptions of the fate, of the wicked (Isaiah 14:11;
66:24; Mark 9:44,46,48). The worm properly belongs to the
description of gehenna rather than hades. The image of the worm
in gehenna would have been understood by Jesus' listeners as a
horrifying picture of the judgment of God. This is the subject of
the last verse of Isaiah (Isaiah 66:24).

(The worm or maggot was in the fires of the Jerusalem "gehenna"
garbage dump. The garbage was full of worms or maggots. They did
not die per se because they became flies. All of this has nothing
to do with "immortal worms" - it has to do with the overall
teaching that the "gehenna fire of the Jerusalem garbage dump"
represented the gehenna fire of the second death, the burning up
of the un-repented sinners - Keith Hunt)


15. Fire. probably the best-known image of hell is that of fire.
The rich man is described as tormented by the flame (Luke 16:24),
and men are salted with fire (Mark 9:49), cast into the lake of
fire (Revelation 20:15), and cast into a furnace of fire (Matthew
13:42). Further, fire and brimstone (Revelation 21:8) and the
unquenchable flame (Mark 9:43,45-46,48) are used to describe
hell. The use of fire to describe hell is not only descriptive
but also emphasizes the continuous suffering of the lost.

(Once more the Caths/Prots believe the fire is "eternal" - never
burning out. And they believe everyone already has eternal life
by having an immortal soul. So the immortal life of the un-
repented sinner will burn in some eternal fire, giving the sinner
everlasting and eternal suffering of some kind, which they cannot
understand, as they cannot understand the "Trinity" teaching.
Seems like there is a lot the Caths/Prots cannot understand about
"theology" and so I guess with them it is a matter of going on
faith, though it be BLIND faith - Keith Hunt)



16. Second death. The eternal abode of the lost is, as noted
above, also designated as the second death, in contrast to
physical death. Those who teach a view of annihilation or soul
sleep often redefine this term to refer to a state of
nonexistence or unconscious existence. In Scripture, however,
death never refers to the cessation of life, but rather to the
separation of something from that to which it belongs. The
Scriptures identity, a body without the spirit and faith without
its evident works as dead (James 2:26). In the same way, the
expression "second death" emphasizes the separation of a man from
God. The consciousness of man is emphasized in the description of
the second death at the final judgment.

(That is the Caths/Prots teaching of "death" and the second
death. Death to them is not death, for them, the dead continue to
live, either in heaven or hell or as in the Catholic teaching
"purgatory." You as the reader and one who studies the Bible need
to come to understand what the Bible teaches, not what men teach.
You will need to do your home-work, spend some time "searching
the Scriptures" - prove all things as Paul said, and hold fast to
that which is good and correct. You can find all kinds of
literature out there as to what the Catholics and Protestants
teach on anything. On this Website I give you the other side of
the coin, the "rest of the story" as Paul Harvey would say. So it
is up to you to search and prove who is correct - Keith Hunt)


17. Wrath of God. Hell is also described in Scripture in terms of
the wrath of God. As an expression of His holiness, truth, and
justice, God must punish sin. As sin is an offense against God
personally, it should not, therefore, be surprising that God is
offended and is therefore angry against sin. To deny the
existence of this anger is to reject the necessity of Christ's
reconciling work on the cross. According to Paul, the wrath of
God can be revealed in nature (Romans 1:18). That wrath, which is
today revealed in part against sin, will someday be expressed
completely in hell.

(Yes, God is angry against SIN! One day there will be NO sin! One
day JUDGMENT will come on all. Sinners, who will not repent of
living in sin, will be punished with everlasting punishment (note
"ment" not "ing") and the second death in the lake of fire will
be the place to punish and destroy the wicked, who will not
accept Jesus as personal Savior, and turn from a life of sin to a
life of serving and obeying God - Keith Hunt)


18. Eternity. All the adjectives applied to hell give it a degree
of suffering that is beyond the realm of human comprehension.
Then acid the word eternity to all the words that describe
suffering, and the reality of hell is compounded far beyond human
understanding. It is one thing to be the object of God's wrath.
It is another to be the object of that wrath for eternity. It is
one thing to be in torment. It is something else to be eternally
tormented. If hell were in any sense tolerable for its
inhabitants, the concept of eternity makes it completely
intolerable.

(Again, the words of the Caths/Prots teach that, like the Trinity
doctrine, you cannot really understand the subject of "hell" -
yet they will still say it is the sinner living for all eternity
in the everlasting fire, which will cause eternal suffering,
anguish and certainly mentally if not some kind of physical pain 
- Keith Hunt)


     The two Greek words "aion" and "aionios" are the terms used
to express time without end, or eternity. The New Testament's use
of these terms is not limited to discussions of hell. If they do
not mean "eternal" when applied to hell, they cannot mean
"eternal" when applied to God, nor to the eternal salvation of
God's people after death. Eternal punishment is the ultimate
consequence of all who end up in hell.

-ELMER TOWNS

                             .................


Entered on this Website May 2008

NOTE:

(The word "eternal" can mean "eternal punishment" - yes indeed
so. But eternal punishMENT is not the same as eternal punishING
.... there is a BIG DIFFERENCE!! The folly that can come from
reading words in the wrong way is truly amplified by the Catholic
and Protestant teaching on "hell."

The subject that mankind has an immortal soul; the subject of
death, going to heaven or hell at death; the thief on the cross
at Jesus' crucifixion; the rich man and Lazarus; Enoch, Moses,
Elijah in heaven; mansions in the sky; better to die and be with
Christ (as Paul once said); and other phrases and passages under
this subject, are all explained somewhere on this Website, either
as individual subjects or as contained in the Gospels and
Epistles, within the New Testament Bible Story.

Sin is to be taken seriously! God takes it seriously! God will
not be mocked! He will render JUDGMENT to all people and nations
on earth. Yes, we shall all stand one day before the judgment
seat of Christ, to be given accordingly either eternal life or
eternal death.

When you take the life of just one person, and put that number of
years that person can live (maybe to a hundred years or more) and
compare that number to ETERNITY PAST AND FUTURE, it is less than
the millionth of the blinking of an eye. When you take the
average life and the average "sins" that people could do doing
that life span, and you put all that against a teaching that God
will put sinners in an ETERNAL FIRE OF SUFFERING AND ANGUISH AND
PAIN, MENTALLY AND/OR PHYSICALLY, I tell you with NO PUNCHES
PULLED, THAT THE TEACHING OF THE CATHOLIC AND PROTESTANT CHURCHES
HAVING A GOD THAT IS SO MERCILESS AND HORRIBLY MINDED AS TO
PUNISH FOR ETERNITY SUCH SINNERS, IS ONE OF THE MOST QUEER,
ECCENTRIC, OUTLANDISH, BIZARRE, FREAKISH, ERRATIC, OUT-OF-THE-
WAY, ABERRANT, FARFETCHED, AND ABNORMAL DOCTRINES IN SO-CALLED
CHRISTIANITY!!

SUCH A TEACHING HELD BY THE ROMAN CATHOLIC AND PROTESTANT
CHURCHES, SHOULD ALL BY ITSELF, LEAVE THE CHAIRS AND PEWS OF
THOSE CHURCHES COMPLETELY EMPTY!!

I DO NOT TEACH OR WORSHIP SUCH AN UGLY, REPULSIVE, HIDEOUS,
GROTESQUE, MONSTROUS GOD, AS WHAT MOST OF CHRISTENDOM SEEMS TO
TEACH AND WORSHIP.

I HAVE TAKEN MANY MANY HOURS TO BRING YOU THIS STUDY (AND MY ANSWERS) 
AND OTHER STUDIES ON THIS SUBJECT TO WHAT THE CATHOLICS AND PROTESTANTS 
TEACH. I AM ANGRY AND UPSET THAT THE TRUTHS OF MY GOD HAVE BEEN SO 
TWISTED THAT SUCH A TEACHING CAN BE CLAIMED AS TO COME FROM MY LORD 
AND SAVIOR.

YOU NEED TO COME TO SEE, IF YOU HAVE NOT ALREADY DONE SO, THE
VERY TRUTH OF THE MATTER ON THIS SUBJECT, FROM THE SCRIPTURES OF
THE LORD, ALL OF THEM, NOT JUST PART OF THEM, AND YOU NEED AS
JESUS SAID, TO KNOW THE TRUTH AND THEN THE TRUTH SHALL INDEED SET
YOU FREE, FROM ALL THE FALSE HIDEOUS TEACHINGS OF A FALSE
CHRISTIANITY.

Keith Hunt


 
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