From  the  book:


THINGS YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT GOD #3



His Names


God in the plural. It is interesting that God used plural pronouns (Gen. 1:26; 3:22; 11:7; Isa. 6:8) and plural verbs (Gen. 1:26; 11:7) to refer to himself. The name for God (Elohim) is plural—though this form is most likely used for intensity.


[NOPE  IT  IS  NOT  USED  JUST  FOR  “INTENSITY”  -  NOT  AT  ALL  -  IT  IS  PLURAL  SIMPLY  BECAUSE  GOD  IS  PLURAL  -  YOU’D  THINK  “TRINITY  BELIEVERS”  WOULD  SEE  THIS  VERY  CLEARLY  -  THEY  SAY  GOD  IS  ONE,  BUT  IN  THREE  SEPARATE  PERSONS  -  Keith Hunt]

Biblical names of persons and places carry great significance, a fact that is especially true with the names for deity. In biblical times, a name represented a person's character. God's name not only represents his character but his attributes and his nature as well. To know his name is to know him. To boast in his name is to have confidence in who he is (Ps. 20:7).


That I may know him. Jesus' prayer on our behalf just before he went to the cross was, "That they may know thee the only true God, and Jesus Christ whom thou hast sent" (John 17:3 KJV). Paul also states the ultimate goal in life, "That I may know him" (Phil. 3:10 KJV). Unfortunately, we often miss the multifaceted aspects of God's nature in translation.


Describing God. As it takes many rays to make up the pure light of the sun, it takes many varied descriptions to give us a true conception of the being and glory of God. No finite person is able to receive the whole revelation of his majesty at once. Only one part at a time can be comprehended. God carefully orchestrated ways to reveal himself with different names and titles describing his nature and purpose so that we may know him.


The Law of First Mention. In Bible study, it is important to keep in mind what Dr. A. T. Pierson calls The Law of First Mention. Often the first mention of a person, place, doctrine, or word is an "embryo of a feature or a fact that will develop further." This idea applies to almost all the divine names and titles in Scripture.


God. The fourth word in the opening of the Bible is the first mentioned name in the Bible—"In the beginning God . . ." (Gen. 1:1). This first verse is his signature, suggesting that the book holy men would write under his inspiration belonged to him.


EL


El, with its derivations Elim, Elohim, and Eloah, is similar to the Greek theos, the Latin Deus, and the English God. This is one of the oldest and most widely distributed terms for deity known to the human race and is used to include all members of the class of deity. This short title is the most primitive Semitic name; its root meaning is most likely "to be strong," "might," or "power" (even when it's not used for God, it is still translated "might" or "power" [Gen. 31:29; Deut. 28:32]).


The poetical name. In classical Hebrew, El is mainly poetical. While found throughout the Old Testament, it is discovered more often in Job and the Psalms than in other books. El is also of the names given to the promised Messiah, El, the mighty (Isa. 9:6-7).


Eloi, Eloi. In the New Testament crucifixion narrative, Jesus cried out in a loud voice, "Eloi, Eloi" (Mark 15:34). In his extreme weakness, he prayed "my strength, my strength," as he cried out for El, "the Strong One—the first and only cause of things." This moment was predicted hundreds of years earlier in Psalm 22 (called the Calvary Psalm). Christ pleads to El in his agony, "My God, My God, why have you forsaken me?"


El is found in ancient compound proper names such as Isra-el, Beth-el, El-elohe-el, meaning "House of Israel," Peni-el, face of El, Prince of El, El Shaddai. This two-letter name can also be found in all biblical names commencing with El, such as Eliakim, Elihu, Elimelech, Elisha, and Elizabeth.


Throughout the Bible, Elohim usually refers to God (found some three thousand times—over twenty-three hundred of which are applied to God). Though Elohim is the primary word translated "God" in the Old Testament, it can also be used of pagan deities or gods. For instance, it is used for idols (Exod. 34:17), men (Ps. 82:6; John 10:34-3 5) angels (Pss. 8:5; 97:7), god-men (Gen. 3:5), and judges (Exod. 22:8). In these instances, the idea of might and authority are communicated by the word. Deuteronomy 10:17 says, "For the Lord your God [Elohim] is God of gods. ..."


Elohim—Creator. The name Elohim primarily designates God as God. The plural ending, him, is especially significant in Hebrew because it indicates three. [I  DOUBT  THAT  VERY  MUCH  -  Keith Hunt] Elohim, the name for God as creator, is used in Genesis 1:1 and thus could be translated, "In the beginning Gods created the heavens and the earth." (In the first two chapters of Genesis, Elohim occurs thirty-five times in connection with God's creative power.)


[YES  THE  REST  OF  THE  BIBLE  SHOWS  GOD,  THOUGH  ONE  GOD,  IS  TWO  PERSONS  IN  THE  GODHEAD  -  GOD  THE  FATHER  AND  HIS  SON  CHRIST  JESUS  -  ALL  THE  VISIONS  OF  GOD’S  THRONE  GIVEN  TO  PEOPLE  LIKE  STEPHEN (FIRST  CHAPTERS OF ACTS) AND IN THE BOOK  OF  REVELATION,  DO  NOT  EVER  SHOW  THE  HOLY  SPIRIT  AS  A  PERSON  SEPARATE  FROM  THE  FATHER  AND  SON  - Keith  Hunt]


The plural Elohim does not mean there was more than one God. Rather, the Old Testament writers used the name with singular verbs and adjectives to denote a singular idea. "The Lord [Jehovah] our God [Elohim], the Lord is one" (Deut. 6:4). God the Father, God the Son, and God the Holy Spirit created the heavens and the earth. One in essence and in character; yet three persons united as one.


[THE  JEWS  NEVER  THOUGHT  OF  “NUMBERS”  IN  THIS  SCRIPTURE  QUOTES,  BUT  IT  IS  THERE  IN  THE  OLD  TESTAMENT  AS  MY  OTHER  STUDIES  SHOW  -  Keith Hunt]


[NOPE  -  THE  HOLY  SPIRIT  IS  NOT  A  SEPARATE  PERSON  -  SEE  THE  MANY  STUDIES  IN  THIS  SECTION  OF  MY  WEBSITE  THAT  PROVE  HOW  MANY  INDIVIDUAL  PERSONS  ARE  IN  THE  GODHEAD  -  Keith Hunt]


Each person in the Godhead had a part in creation. In various parts of Scripture, you can see the different persons of the Godhead participating in the work of creation. In Genesis 1:2-3 we read, "the Spirit of God was moving over the surface of the waters.”


[THIS  DOES  NOT  SAY  “GOD  THE  SPIRIT  WAS …..”  BUT  “TRINITY”  TEACHERS  WANT  YOU  TO  REASD  IT  THIS  WAY.  BUT  IT  SAYS  WHAT  IT  SAYS…. “THE  SPIRIT  OF  GOD…..”  THE  SPIRIT  THAT  BELONGS  OR  COMES,  IS  OF  GOD,  WAS  MOVING…..


Then God said, 'Let there be light'; and there was light" (NASB). God spoke, the Spirit moved, and Colossians 1:16 tells us that in him, Christ Jesus, the Son of God, "all things were created, both in the heavens and on earth." This is also seen in the creation of man. In Genesis 1:26, we read, "Then God [Elohim] said, 'Let us make man in our image.'"


[YES  IT  IS  SIMPLE  TO  READ,  A  CHILD  CAN  UNDERSTAND  -  IT  IS  “Let  US  make  man  in  OUR  image.”  MORE  THAN  ONE  PERSON  IN  THE  GODHEAD.  PAUL  ALSO  MADE  IT  PLAIN,  OR  I  SHOULD  SAY,  WAS  INSPIRED  TO  TELL  US  IN  1  CORINTHIANS  11,  THE  GODHEAD  IS  THE  FATHER  AND  THE  SON,  AND  THE  FATHER  IS  HEAD  OF  THE  SON;  TWO  THINGS  THAT  BLOW  THE  “TRINITY”  DOCTRINE  OUT  OF  THE  WATER  -  THAT  SMASH  IT  TO  A  MILLION  PIECES  -  Keith Hunt]


The maker and keeper of covenant. The idea conveyed by Elohim is always that of one in a covenant relationship. In his words to Abram, Elohim's name pledges this relationship: “I am the Almighty God; walk before me, and be thou perfect.. . . And I will establish my covenant between me and thee and thy seed after thee in their generations. . . and I will be their Elohim,” that is, I will be I with them in covenant relationship (Gen. 17:1-8 KJV).


"I am the Lord your God,. . . you are precious and honored in my sight,. . . everyone who is called by my name, whom I created for my glory, whom I formed and made" (Isa. 43:3-4, 7). The word for "glory" in Greek is doxa, and it means to give the correct opinion or estimate of. We have been created for God's glory—to give all of creation a correct opinion or estimate of who God is.


[IN  GOD  MAKING  MANKIND  IN  HIS  IMAGE,  AND  FOR  HIS  PLAN  WITH  THEM,  HE  WAS  GOING  TO  SHOW  ALL  THAT  HE  REALLY  IS  GOD  ABOVE  ALL  AND  EVERYTHING  -  HAVING  ONES  WHO  CAN  BE  LITERALLY  BORN  INTO  HIS  FAMILY  -  THE  ULTIMATE  THAT  GOD  CAN  DO  -  Keith Hunt]


Elah, Eloah—the Adorable One. Elah is the Chaldee form of Eloah, which is known as a verbal noun, and is associated with the Hebrew verb alah, meaning to fear, to worship, to adore. The Adorable One. This distinctive divine name stands for the nature and expression of the only living and true God, the object of all testimony and worship. David asked, "Who is [Eloah] besides the Lord?" (2 Sam. 22:32). God asks, "Is there any [Eloah] besides me?" (Isa. 44:8).


One of the oldest names for God is "Redeemer." In faith Job proclaimed, "I know that my Redeemer lives, and that in the end he will stand upon the earth. And after my skin has been destroyed, yet in my flesh I will see God" (19:25-26). Eloah, the one we worship and adore.


[INTERESTING….. ‘YET  IN  MY  FLESH  I  WILL  SEE  GOD!’  SHOWS  JOB  WILL  BE  ABLE  TO  MAKE  HIMSELF  FLESH  AND  BONE  AS  JESUS  DID  AFTER  HIS  RESURRECTION.  ANYONE  IN  THE  GOD  FAMILY  WILL  BE  ABLE  TO  DO  THIS,  AND  SEE  EACH  OTHER  IN  THAT  FORM.  KJV  MARGIN  HAS  “APART  FROM  MY  FLESH,  OR  OUT  OF  MY  FLESH,  I  WILL  SEE  GOD”  IN  THE  RESURRECTION  WE  SHALL  SEE  ALL  IN  THE  FAMILY  OF  GOD  IN  GLORIOUS  SPIRIT  FORM.  EITHER  WAY  BOTH  ARE  TURE  -  Keith Hunt]


Eloah—Absolute Deity. As in Elohim we have unity in the Trinity, so in Eloah we have absolute Deity. Both the Old and New Testaments emphasize, "The Lord our God is one Lord."


[YES  BOTH  MEMBERS  OF  THE  GODHEAD  ARE  UNITY  OF  ONE  LORD  -  ONE  GOD,  BUT  TWO  PERSONS  -  Keith Hunt]


The first occurrence of Elah is in Ezra 4:24 where it is used in connection with the work of rebuilding "the house of God" (Elah). This divine title occurs some ninety times in the Old Testament—forty-three times in Ezra, forty-six times in Daniel, and once in Jeremiah 10:10. Elah indicates that the living and true God is identified with his people in captivity. The word Elah means an oak—the tree symbolizing durability—a virtue characteristic of him who is "the Everlasting God."


El Elyon—the Most High God. The compound El-Elyon designates God as the highest, the most high (Ps. 78:35). He is the sovereign ruler over all the universe. It was El Elyon, "God Most High, who delivered" Abraham's enemies into his hand (Gen. 14:20). It was the Most High God who was and is the Redeemer of Israel (Ps. 78:35). And it is the Most High God who rules today over the affairs of men (Dan. 4:34—35). Although humanity has been given a free will, God still overrules so that no man, angel, demon, devil, or any circumstance of life can thwart his plan.


The Highest in Order. Several names for God are applied in Scripture to things and persons of the world. Elyon, for instance, was a name used by other nations than Israel. But wherever it is used, the person or thing it speaks of is the highest of a series or order of "like natures." When applied to God, Elyon or "Most High" reveals that though he is the highest, others below him are endowed with like natures, and are therefore in some way related to him.


[OH  YES,  GOD  THE  FATHER  WILL  ALWAYS  BE  THE  “MOST  HIGH”  -  OTHERS  IN  HIS  FAMILY  ARE  BELOW  HIM  IN  AUTHORITY,  EVEN  AS  PAUL  SAID  ABOUT  JESUS  IN  1  CORINTHIANS  11  -  THE  GODHEAD  -  Keith Hunt]


Theos. In the New Testament, the term theos takes the place of El, Elohim, and Elyon. The names Shaddai and El Shaddai are rendered pantokrator, the almighty, and theos pantokrator, God almighty. Sometimes the Lord is called "the Alpha and the Omega" (Rev. 1:8), "who is, and who was, and who is to come" (Rev. 1:4), "the First and the Last" (Rev. 2:8), and "the Beginning and the End" (Rev. 21:6).


[THEOS  IN  GREEK  IS  “GOD”  -  GOD  THE  FATHER  IS  THEOS  -  JESUS  CHRIST  IS  THEOS  -  NOWHERE  CAN  YOU  FIND  “THEOS  THE  HOLY  SPIRIT  DID……”  BECAUSE  THE  HOLY  SPIRIT  IS  OF  GOD,  COMES  FROM  GOD,  SEE  MY  OTHER  STUDIES  OF  THIS  UNDER  THIS  SECTION  OF  MY  WEBSITE  -  Keith Hunt]


El-Elohe-Israel—God of Israel. Jacob gave this name to the altar he erected at Shalem (Gen. 33:18-20). Jacob's act of faith, allocating his new name, Israel, also claims Elohim. Only with God could Israel walk according to his new name. (When God's name is connected to human names, it communicates that the bearer of the name experienced a new revelation of God's character and purpose, such as the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, the God of Jacob, etc.)


El Olam—God of Eternity. A rare title in Scripture, El Olam describes what extends beyond our farthest vision, whether looking forward or backward, to instill a sense of purpose. Such reason is found in the God of Eternity, or as the KJV translates it, "the Ever lasting God." Any time this name occurs, a reference (sometimes more hidden) is made to the distinct stages of God's dealings with his people through his eternal wisdom.


The first occurrence of the name El Olam carries heavy spiritual significance. It is found in connection with Abraham's struggle with Abimelech over the right to use wells. God caused Abraham to wander for many years, until at last he felt as if he could settle in the pastures near the streams of Beersheba. But the I men of Gerar wanted to oust him. It was at this time that El Olam, God the Everlasting, revealed himself to Abraham, reminding him of an everlasting purpose (Gen. 20:13).


El Roi—the God who sees. Have you ever been unjustly turned away or thrown out, perhaps abandoned? Perhaps you fulfilled someone's pleasure and then you weren't wanted anymore. Maybe you have a child who has run away. Deep in your heart you may wonder if you failed in some way or were inadequate. Divorces, company layoffs, affairs, thefts . . . where is God? Does he know what is going on? The omnipresent God is there with you, and he sees all. Healing begins with a God who saw it all. We can trust in righteous judgment because he is El Roi; he saw it all (2Thess. 1:5-10).


The only occurrence of the title El Roi in Scripture is in connection with Hagar's flight from Sarah. Out in the wilderness of Shur, God spoke to Sarah's handmaid, instructing her to return. Hagar had borne the son of Sarah's husband, Abraham (Genesis 16), and then was terribly mistreated. El Roi accompanies us as we turn back and face our oppressors. Writes the psalmist, "Where can I go from your Spirit? Where can I flee from your presence?" (Ps. 139:7).


[A  THIRD  LITERAL  PERSON  CAN  NOT  BE  EVERYWHERE  IN  THE  UNIVERSE,  SO  WHEREVER  YOU  GO,  OR  WHEREVER  GOD’S  CHILDREN   MAY  GO  IN  THE  UNIVERSE,  GOD’S  SPIRIT  IS  THERE.  GOD’S  SPIRT  COMES  FROM  -  OUT  OF  -  GOD  THE FATHER  AND  CHRIST  JESUS  -  IT  IS  THEIR  VERY  POWERFUL  NATURE  THAN  CAN  INDEED  BE  EVERYWHERE  IN  THE  UNIVERSE  -  Keith Hunt]


El Shaddai—the Almighty, All-Sufficient One. The translation of the Hebrew word Shaddai is not totally clear in its meaning because scholars are not absolutely sure of its root word, but many believe it is a designation of God as the All-Sufficient One.


The first mention of the all-sufficient nature of God comes during a solemn occasion when God appeared to Abram and opened his message to the patriarch with "I am the Almighty God" (Gen. 17:1 KJV). When the Lord appeared, ninety-nine-year-old Abram fell on his face before God (Gen. 17:1-3). El Shaddai, the All-Sufficient One, made a covenant with the new father of nations and changed his name to Abraham. The same title was used when God appeared to Jacob and Isaac to bless them. In God all fullness dwells, and out of his constant fullness, his own receive all things.


Shaddai. The thought expressed in this name for God describes power, not of violence but of all-bountifulness. Shaddai primarily means "breasted," being formed directly from the Hebrew word shad, that is, "the breast," or more precisely, a woman's breast. Lewis G. Parkhust explains the divine title or name Shaddai as "'The Pourer or Shedder forth,' One that Satisfies with blessings both physical and spiritual." "Can a woman forget her nursing child, and have no compassion [tenderness] on the son of her womb? Even these may forget, but I will not forget you" (Isa. 49:15 NASB).


Sheddim, the kindred name to Shaddai, refers to objects of idolatrous worship in other parts of Scripture and describes the many-breasted idols, representing the genial powers of nature, which were worshiped among the heathen as givers of rain and bounty. El Shaddai is the true Giver of Life—even of his own life, of whom these heathen Sheddim were the idolatrous perversion.


Adonai—Lord Master/Ruler is a title that appears frequently in the prophets, expressing humanity's dependence and submission, as of a servant to his master or a wife to her husband. The title, Lord of Hosts, appears frequently in the prophetical and postexilic literature (Isa. 1:9; 6:3 NRSV). Some take the term to refer to God's presence with the armies of Israel in the times of the monarchy (1 Sam. 4:4; 17:45; 2 Sam. 6:2), but a more probable meaning is God's presence with the hosts of heaven, the angels (Ps. 89:6-8; cf. James 5:4).


Adonai is a title that heathen nations applied to their gods. The Greek word comes from the Phoenician word adon, which means "lord." In Scripture it is often compounded with Jehovah as a proper name as, for instance, in Adoni-jah, which means "Jehovah is Lord." Baal-was also used, which implies master or owner.


Baal. While we think of Baal as the title of the Canaanite local gods, in earlier times it was actually used by worshipers of God. For this reason, one of Saul's sons was named Ish-baal. One of David's men of war was known as Baaliah, which means, "Jehovah is Baal." When this title came to have degrading associations, proper names were changed and Baal became Bosheth, which was substituted in names such as Ishbosheth.


Jehovah


The Name of God. "He that blasphemeth the name of the Lord, he shall surely be put to death" (Lev. 24:16 KJV). In response to the Old Testament Law, every Jew became so alarmed at the danger connected with the pronouncing or writing of this wonderful name that they dared not give expression to it for fear that the stroke of God might come upon them for uttering, and possibly blaspheming, the incomprehensible, or what might be called, the name of God.


Jehovah or Yahweh—the Eternal, Ever-Loving One. This is the personal name par excellence of Israel's God. The term is connected with the Hebrew verb "to be," and means the "self-existent one," or the "one who causes to be." This name is often translated into the English version by the word "Lord," using capital and small capital letters.


Jehovah is the most frequently used of all the different names of God in the Old Testament (appearing about seven thousand times). Its meaning is "God of the covenant." The first usage occurs in Genesis, where Jehovah is compounded with Elohim.


Among all the divine names none is so solemn as Jehovah.


Rabbinical writings have distinguished Jehovah by such euphemistic expressions as "the Name," "the Great and Terrible Name," "the Peculiar Name," "the Separate Name," "the Unutterable Name," "the Ineffable Name," "the Incommunicate Name," "the Holy Name," and "the Distinguished Name." It was also known as "the Name of Four Letters" because when taken from the Hebrew it is spelled YHVH in English. Such Jewish reverence remains today—so much so that many refrain from writing it or pronouncing it.


At the time of the covenant, God gave something to Abram, which at once changed him from Abram to Abraham. What God adds is the letter he, the chief letter of his own name Jehovah—that sound which can only be uttered by an out-breathing—thus giving to the elect something of his own nature (remember, a name denotes nature).

The meaning of this ancient name, which is said to be whispered only by the high priest in the Holy of Holies once a year, is perhaps most adequately described in the Book of Revelation. The absoluteness of the divine, who is independent and self-existent, is found in the declaration "I am Alpha and Omega, the beginning and the ending, saith the Lord [Jehovah] which is, and which was, and which is to come, the Almighty" (Rev. 1:8 KJV).


Jehovah means "am who I am." At the burning bush, Moses "said to God, 'Behold, I am going to the sons of Israel, and I will say to them, "The God of your fathers has sent me to you." Now they may say to me, "What is His name?" What shall I say to them?' God said to Moses, I am who I am;' and He said, 'Thus you shall say to the sons of Israel, "I am has sent me to you." . . . " The Lord, the God of your fathers, the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob, has sent me to you." This is My name forever, and this is My memorial-name to all generations'" (Exod. 3:13-15 NASB).


The name Jehovah is derived from the archaic havah, which means "to be, to become." Jehovah speaks of God's being or essence. When we read the name of Jehovah, or Lord in capital and small capital letters in our Bible, we should think in terms of being, or existence and life, and we must think of Jehovah as the being who is absolutely self-existent, the one who in himself possesses essential life and permanent existence.


JAH—the Independent One. JAH, which is pronounced "ya," is a shortened form of Jehovah. This name signifies that he is, and can be made to correspond to I am, just as Jehovah corresponds to the fuller expression I am that I am. The name first appears in the triumphal Song of Moses in Exodus 15. We also see the combination, "JAH Jehovah is my strength and my song," where both present and future deliverance are implied (Isa. 12:2).


JAH is the present tense of the verb "to be". It suggests Jehovah as the present living God—the presence of God in daily life, or his present activity. JAH is "an ever-present help in trouble" (Ps. 46:1, emphasis added). Most people miss the connection with the often-repeated exclamation, "Praise ye the Lord," also meaning, "Praise ye JAH," or "Hallelujah."


JAH in human names. JAH, the shortened form of Jehovah, is interwoven like other divine names with human names, always with a particular purpose and meaning. Many more names contain JAH at the end than at the beginning, most likely to show reverence. For example, Ahljah means "whose father is Jehovah."


God's title, JAH, is found in Psalm 68:4: "Extol him that rideth upon the heavens by his name [JAH], and rejoice before him" (KJV). The same Hebrew word occurs over forty times in Isaiah, the Psalms, and Exodus but is translated "the Lord" in our English Bible. Regrettably, the various titles of God have not been given their Hebrew significance in translation.


Jehovah occurs in a number of powerful combinations.

Jehovah-Jireh, the Lord will provide (Gen. 22:14); Jehovah-Rapha, the Lord that heals (Exod. 15:26); Jehovah-Nissi, the Lord is my banner (Exod. 17:15); Jehovah-Shalom, the Lord is peace (Judg. 6:24); Jehovah-Raah, the Lord is my shepherd (Ps. 23:1); Jehovah-Tsidqenu, the Lord our righteousness (Jer. 23:6); and Jehovah-Shammah, the Lord is present (Ezek. 48:35).


Jehovah-Eloheenu—the Lord Our God. Nineteen times this expression is given in the Book of Deuteronomy. It is a title suggesting the commonwealth of God's people in him (Ps. 99:5, 8-9).


From references in Deuteronomy, we learn what he is (6:4), where he is (4:7), what he said (1:6, 19; 2:37; 5:25, 27), what he did (2:33, 36; 3:3; 23:14), what he gave (1:20, 25), what he has (29:29), and what he shows (5:24).


Jehovah-Eloheka—the Lord Thy God. This title is closely related to Jehovah-Eloheenu (though it's more personal) and like-wise occurs frequently in Deuteronomy, being found in chapter 16 ] twenty times. Often used in the Book of Exodus, this divine name I describes Jehovah's relationship to his people and focuses more on their responsibility to him.


Jehovah-Elohai—the Lord My God. This name can be linked to Adon or Adonai, a personal name meaning my Lord, and likewise emphasizing divine sovereignty (Judg. 6:15; 13:8). Elohai specifically points to the personal pronoun "my" as being expressive of a personal faith in the God of power (Zech. 14:5). Though he is God of his people, we can know him—all that he is in himself and all his blessings on us personally.


Jehovah-Hoseenu—the Lord Our Maker. In Psalm 95:6, the writer invites us to join him in approaching the throne of God, "Come, let us bow down in worship, let us kneel before the Lord our Maker." The Hebrew word asah is used to speak about God in a variety of ways as our maker. When this term is applied to Jehovah as our maker, the reference is not to his work at creation when he spoke things into being, but rather to his ability to fashion something out of what already exists. Paul reminds us that "we are his workmanship."


Jehovah-Jireh—the Lord Will Provide. This name stands as a monument of a great discovery and a remarkable deliverance in Genesis 22. The story of Abraham and Isaac introduces the God who sees and provides. For death there is only one provider, Jehovah-Jireh. Jehovah, who in himself possesses essential life, is the only one who can make provision for sinful man to live, and he does it by providing the Lamb of God who takes away the sins of the world.


Jehovah-Jireh—"Sees all of our needs." The word for provide, jireh, in the Old Testament means literally to see. How do the words see and provide relate? Because of his omniscience and perfection of character, God not only sees, he foresees. And Jehovah-Jireh provides for, or supplies, whatever the foreseen need may be. The seeing or providing of the ram was what caused Abraham to name that place "The Lord Will Provide. And to this day it is said, 'On the mountain of the Lord it will be provided'" or "it will be seen" (Gen. 22:14).


Jehovah-Jireh—The Provider of Our Salvation/Mount Moriah (provides for both life and death). Moriah, in the Hebrew, is a kindred word to Jireh, taken from "Jehovah seeing," and can be translated "seen of JAH," or "the vision of Jehovah." Not only was Mount Moriah the location where Abraham offered Isaac, but it was also the site on which Solomon would build the house of the Lord in Jerusalem (2 Chron. 3:1). Down through the ages, at Mount Moriah every temple sacrifice for sin would echo Abraham's words, "The Lord Will Provide [Jehovah-Jireh]" (Gen. 22:14).

Jehovah-Meqoddishkem (or M'Qaddesh)—the Lord Who Sanctifies You. God brought his people to Mount Sinai where he gave them the covenant of the Law and the pattern of the tabernacle where they would worship their God. These commandments would set them apart for God's own possession. Here they would come to know Jehovah as Jehovah-Meqoddishkem through observing his Sabbaths (Exod. 31:12-18).


The words sanctify, set apart, holy, and saint all come from a common root word, qadash in the Hebrew and hagios in the Greek. For the first time in Scripture, at Mount Sinai the purpose of the command for the Sabbath is laid out before the children of Israel. The Sabbath is to be a sign between God and Israel throughout all their generations so "that you may know that I am the Lord who sanctifies you" (Exod. 31:13 NASB) . As God made the Sabbath holy to the children of Israel, he made the children of Israel holy, or set apart, unto himself.


As God sanctified Israel, he sanctifies the church. Holiness is not an option for believers, rather it is part of a perpetual covenant ... a sign between God and the sons of Israel forever. "By this will we have been sanctified through the offering of the body of Jesus Christ once for all" (Heb. 10:10 NASB; see also John 17:15-19; 1 Thess. 4:3-8; 5:23).


The correct pronunciation of JHWH, the original name of  God, has been lost. After a certain time, no knowledge remained of the way in which Jehovah should be pronounced. When Jewish scribes were writing out the Scriptures and came to the name of  Jehovah, the Awful One, they would in most cases not write it as  originally given, but would write the less awful name of Adonai, meaning, "my Ruler."


The Banner


Jehovah-Nissi—the Lord My Banner first appears in Exodus 17 at verse 8 with this significant statement: "Then Amalek came and fought against Israel" (NASB). Amalek, the grandson of Esau, was the first and constant enemy of Israel. And there would be no white flag of surrender in this battle. Amalek was an enemy of God and had to be subdued. In this famous battle, God was first worshiped as Jehovah-Nissi, "The Lord is my Banner" (Exod. 17:15). When Moses held up his hands, Israel prevailed, but when his arms grew weak and fell, Amalek would begin to conquer.


A banner was an ensign or standard carried at the head of a military band to indicate the line of march or the rallying point. A banner in ancient times was not necessarily a flag such as we use today. Often it was a bare pole with a bright shining ornament that glittered in the sun. The word nissi has interesting implications: as a standard (Isa. 5:26), as a sign (Num. 26:10), and as a pole in connection with the brazen serpent lifted up upon it to give life to Israel. Our Savior was lifted up on the pole, and by all he accomplished, we have victory.


The fearless and courageous Joshua came to the front in God's war against Amalek. He had a name that in its Hebrew form means Jesus—"I will be salvation." Isaiah prophesied that "the Root of Jesse will stand as a banner for the peoples" and one around which the Gentiles and Israel would rally (Isa. 11:10, 12).


A monument was built to celebrate this glorious deliverance from Amalek. Moses built an altar and called it Jehovah-Nissi, or Jehovah my Banner. Moses took care to give God the glory.


Although the name Jehovah-Nissi appears only here on the memorial altar, the truth it expresses runs throughout Scripture.


Jehovah-Qanna. When God gave the Ten Commandments, he said, "I am the Lord your God, who brought you out of Egypt, out of the land of slavery. You shall have no other gods before me. . . . You shall not bow down to them or worship them; for I, the Lord your God, am a jealous God" (Exod. 20:1-5). Again in Exodus 34:12-17, God tells his people not to make covenant with the inhabitants of the land into which they were going because "the Lord, whose name is Jealous, is a jealous God" (v. 14).


Holy jealousy. A holy and godly jealousy is rooted in divine love (2 Cor. 11:2), and God acts according to his name just as he has warned his people he will. His people acted like harlots in their worship of idols and other gods, and God kept his promise—his presence left Jerusalem (Ezra 8:3-6, 17-18; 9:9-10).


God's Word stands above and according to his name. Although God's presence withdrew from Jerusalem, God came back because he is a God of covenant (promise). God was jealous for his holy name, but his Word stands above or according to his name, so he would return in his glory to Jerusalem, though his children would have to wait approximately six hundred years. He returned as the Messiah, but most of Israel did not recognize him. He came to his own, but his own received him not (John 1:11).


Healer and Shepherd


Jehovah-Rapha (Rophi)—the Lord That Heals. "Is there no balm in Gilead? Is there no physician there?" (Jer. 8:22). Rapha means "to mend," as a garment is mended, "to repair" as a building is reconstructed, and "to cure" as a diseased person is restored to health. The psalmist wrote, "who . . . heals all your diseases" (Ps. 103:3). In Ezekiel, the Hebrew word for "heal" is translated as "physician" (30:21). Jehovah-Rapha also heals a distressed nation or person by restoring them to prosperous circumstances; healing in a moral sense, curing the mind and pardoning the soul.


The children of Israel needed a healer. Soon after God delivered Israel, they needed him as Jehovah-Rapha. As Moses led his people from the Red Sea into the wilderness of Shur, they found no water. When they came to Marah they couldn't drink because the water was bitter. The people grumbled. When Moses cried out to the Lord, God showed him a tree to throw into the waters and they became sweet. God then tested his people, saying, "If you will give earnest heed to the voice of the Lord your God, ... I will put none of the diseases on you which I have put on the Egyptians; for I, the Lord, am your healer" (Exod. 15:26).


Heal me, O Lord." Whether it is the illness of a nation or of a single human being, it is God who heals lands, pestilences, bodies, emotions, souls, and spirits. He may use other humans as his instruments, but they are useless without the Physician's power to heal. Whenever one needs healing, he or she must first consult Jehovah-Rapha. "Heal me, O Lord, and I shall be healed; save me, and I shall be saved: for thou art my praise" (Jer. 17:14).


The term heal is used: to express God's grace in restoring spiritual life—he heals all our diseases, spiritual as well as physical (Ps. 103:3). To heal the broken in heart (Ps. 147:3). To recover the faithless from backsliding (Jer. 3:22). To remove bodily sickness or disease (Gen. 20:17; 2 Kings 20:5).


Jehovah-Raah (Rohi)—the Lord my Shepherd. This name has several meanings, all suggesting the many aspects of Jehovah's care. For example, it can be translated "feeder, keeper" (Gen. 4:2), "companion" (Prov. 28:7), "friend" (Judg. 14:20), "pastor" (Jer. 17:16), "herdsman" (Gen. 13:7), and "shepherd" (Ps. 23:1).


Pastoral people of the Bible lands are familiar with the life and caring role of a shepherd and the utter dependence of sheep on their shepherd. Many have found great comfort knowing God thinks and cares for us as sheep. "We all, like sheep, have gone astray" (Isa. 53:6). "My sheep hear my voice" (John 10:27). "We are . . . sheep of his pasture" (Ps. 100:3 nrsv). "I. . . will search for My sheep and seek them out" (Ezek. 34:11 NASB). "Feed my sheep" (John 21:17). Many Scriptures refer to God as our shepherd and to us as his sheep (John 10:1-17, 26-30).


The Twenty-third Psalm opens by summarizing one of the greatest truths concerning what it means to be a child of God—to have him as our Jehovah-Raah. "The Lord is my shepherd; I shall not want" (KJV). The rest of the psalm describes why there is no want for those whose shepherd is Jehovah. "He maketh me to lie down" (v. 2). Here the psalmist is not describing a shepherd who forces his sheep to rest, but rather he is saying that because the shepherd has met all the flock's needs, it can lie down. According to Phillip Keller, it is impossible for a sheep to lie down unless four things are true:


First, sheep must be free from hunger. They cannot lie down as long as they feel a need for finding food. In the second verse of Psalm 23, the Shepherd has so satisfied the sheeps hunger that they can lie down in the midst of green pastures.

Second, if sheep are to rest, they must be free of fear. Sheep are helpless, timid animals with little self-defense, and they are easily frightened.

Third, sheep cannot rest unless they are free from friction. Tension with other sheep keeps them on their feet. They feel they must defend themselves.

Fourth, sheep cannot rest unless they are free from pests like flies, parasites, or things that torment them.


[PHILLIP  KELLER’S  BOOK  “A  SHEPHERD  LOOKS  AT  THE  23RD  PSALM”  IS  ON  THIS  WEBSITE….. A  GREAT  READ  -  Keith Hunt]


The God of Peace


Jehovah-Sabaoth (also Tsebaoth)—the Lord of Hosts. The word sabaoth is tsebaah according to Strong's Concordance and is the word for "a mass," "a mass of people or things, such as an army." It is used to refer to a host of angels or heavenly bodies, a celestial army, or to all that the earth contains.


The name Jehovah-Sabaoth is not used in Scripture until the Book of 1 Samuel; following that, it is used in two out of three instances by individuals. At that time Israel did not apparently see her need to call upon God as Lord of Hosts. Yet when we read the prophets Isaiah, Jeremiah, Amos, Haggai, Zechariah, and Malachi, we find this name for God used over and over again. It appears fifty-two times in Zechariah's fourteen chapters, and eighty-three times in Jeremiah's fifty-two chapters.


God is repeatedly referred to as the Lord of Hosts in the Books of Isaiah and Jeremiah but not in Ezekiel. Why? Because this name belongs to a certain stage in the experience of God's people. This is a name for those who in the midst of a struggle find their own resources inadequate. In desperation they called on the name of Jehovah-Sabaoth. On the other hand, it is not a name used by those who have ceased to fight—such as those found in Ezekiei in the days when they were forced to settle into seventy years of captivity.


From God's perspective, Lord of Hosts is a name that reminds his people exactly who he is. Not only is he the one who delivers, he is also the one who judges. We see God in the Book of Malachi reminding his people over and over again of his name, Jehovah-Sabaoth. “I am not pleased with you,' says the Lord of hosts. . . . 'For My name will be great among the nations,' says the Lord of hosts.. . . I am a great King,' says the Lord of hosts,' and ‘My name is feared among the nations'" (Mai. 1:10-11, 14 nasb).


Jehovah-Shalom—the Lord Is Peace. In the dark hours of Israel's history during the time of the judges, God revealed himself as Jehovah-Shalom, "the Lord is peace." The sons of Israel had done evil in the sight of the Lord, and he had given them into the hands of the Midianites for seven years. Things were bad for God's chosen people (Judg. 6:6). Midian prevailed against Israel, forcing them into mountain caves and dens. Judges 6 describes the Midianites coming up with the Amalekites to ravage and devastate the Israelites' crops and all their livestock. God's people were desperate for peace.


Jehovah-Shalom revealed true peace to Gideon. "When Gideon saw that he was the angel of the Lord, he said, 'Alas O Lord God! For now I have seen the angel of the Lord face to face.' The Lord said to him, 'Peace to you, do not fear; you shall not die.' Then Gideon built an altar there to the Lord and named it The Lord is Peace" (Judg. 6:22-24 nasb). True peace cannot be found in any other place than in right relationship with God.


The basic underlying meaning of the Hebrew word shalom is "a harmony of relationship or a reconciliation"; therefore, the word is most often translated "peace" (approximately 170 times). The first time shalom appears in the Bible is in connection with "eternal peace." "Thou shalt go to thy fathers in peace" (Gen. 15:15).


The uniqueness of the word shalom can be gathered from its alternative renderings: "welfare" (Gen. 43:27); "good health" (Gen. 43:28); "all is well, safe" (2 Sam. 18:28-29); "prosperity" (Ps. 35:27); "favor" (Song of Sol. 8:10); "rest" (Ps. 38:3); "whole" (Deut. 27:6); "finished" (1 Kings 9:25; Dan. 5:26); "full" (Gen. 15:16); "make good" (Exod. 21:34); "restitution or repay, well or welfare" (Exod. 22: 5, 6); and "pay or perform in the sense of fulfilling or completing obligations" (Pss. 37:21; 50:14). Several times it is given as "perfect" (1 Chron. 29:19), the idea of wholeness or being in harmony with God.


The God Who Is There

   

Jehovah-Shammah—the Lord Is There. The children of Israel were in captivity and would be there for seventy years as a result of their sin (Jer. 29:10). They had heard from the prophet Ezekiel how the glory of the Lord had departed from the temple (Ezek. 10:18-19; 11:22-24). God had to judge his people for their adultery as a nation. "How I have been hurt by their adulterous hearts, which have turned away from me. . . . They will loathe themselves for the evil they have done. . . . And they will know that I am the Lord . . ." (Ezek. 6:9). God left them with a future hope.


Jehovah-Shammah is found in the last verse of the Book of Ezekiel where it is used in reference to the earthly Jerusalem, the city that the Lord Jesus Christ will inhabit when he returns to earth to reign as King of Kings and Lord of Lords. "The distance all around will be 18,000 cubits. And the name of the city from that time on will be: the Lord is there" (Ezek. 48:35).


The word shammah is simply the word for "there," but the fact that it is combined with Jehovah and the fact that the Spirit of God calls it a name makes it unique. When God named the futuristic city Jehovah-Shammah, he was assuring his people that he, Jehovah, would be there. It assured them of a future and gave them purpose.


God's presence did return to Jerusalem. Scripture tells us he came again to the temple when he was twelve, but although the Jews were impressed, they did not realize they were listening to Jehovah-Shammah (Luke 2:42-47). At the age of thirty, Jehovah-Shammah began his ministry among them (Luke 3:23). They saw his miracles and heard his words, but still they would not believe.


Jehovah-Tsidqenu—the Lord our righteousness. In a dark hour of judgment and failure, God revealed to his people another of his names—Jehovah-Tsidqenu. "This is the name by which he will be called: “The Lord Our Righteousness” (Jer. 23:6). And with that revelation comes the promise of a new covenant, the covenant of grace and a new heart (Jer. 31:31-34; Matt. 26:26-28; Heb. 8:6-13).


To be right with God or to be righteous means to be "straight." It is more than goodness. It is to do what God says is right, to live according to his standards. To do so requires a new heart. "I will put my law in their minds and write it on their hearts. . . . For I will forgive their wickedness and will remember their sins no more" (Jer. 31:33-34). "I will give you a new heart and put a new spirit in you; I will remove from you your heart of stone and give you a heart of flesh. And I will put my Spirit in you and move you to follow my decrees and be careful to keep my laws" (Ezek. 36:26-27).


The Hebrew term Tsedeq depicts a full weight or measure toward God in the spiritual sense, as contrasted to justice, which is represented as a woman holding a pair of balanced scales in her hand. (See Job 31:6; Ps. 62:9.) Jehovah-Tsidqenu is like a river flowing throughout the whole of Scripture. Appearing well over a thousand times in Scripture, this word is translated as "right, righteous," and also as "just, justify," and "declared innocent."


The message of righteousness can be found on almost every page of the Bible. It is the chain of truth opening out in depth and force to grab our attention/not only because of its messianic nature but because of personal, practical implications. God wanted his children to recognize that goodness and character were of greater value than the wealth, wisdom, and ways of the world.


[YES  INDEED  SO  -  BUT  MOST  JUST  WILL  NOT  CARRY  THIS  UNDERSTANDING  OPVER  INTO  OBSERVING  THE  WEEKLY  SABBATH  -  THE  4TH  COMMANDMENT  TODAY  IS  JUST  ABOUT  NEV ER  MENTIONED;  MOST  CHRISTIANS  DO  NOT  THINK   ABOUT  IT;  MOST  WOULD  CERTAINLY  NOT  GIVE  UP  A  JOB  TO  OBSERVE  THE  SABBATH;  OR  NOT  PLAY  ON  A  SPORTS  TEAM  ON  THE  SABBATH  -  RIGHTEOUSNESS  IS  PSALM 119:172  -  Keith Hunt]


Jehovah-Makkeh—the Lord Shall Smite Thee. "I will recompense thee according to thy ways and thine abominations that are in the midst of thee; and ye shall know that I am the Lord that smiteth [Jehovah-Makkeh]" (Ezek. 7:9 KJV). The American Standard Version translates the passage, "Ye shall know that I, Jehovah, do smite." God had dealt graciously with his people, but they had despised his grace. They refused to walk in his statutes and to keep his judgments. Because of the gross sin of the people, he had to deal with them in judgment.


Jehovah-Gmolah—the God of Recompense or Vengeance (he will fully repay). While Jehovah-Gmolah may with hold his judgment, vengeance is ultimately meted to those who mock his authority. The weeping prophet, Jeremiah, wrote:


"Babylon has been a golden cup in the hand of the Lord [Jehovah], 

intoxicating all the earth. The nations have drunk of her
wine; therefore the nations are going mad" (NASB). As a result,
"the destroyer is coming against her, against Babylon, and her
mighty men will be captured, their bows are shattered; for the
Lord is a God of recompense, He will fully repay" (Jer. 51:7,
56 NASB).


Vengeance belongs to God, not to us. "Recompense to no man evil for evil. . . . Avenge not yourselves, but rather give place unto wrath: for it is written, Vengeance is mine; I will repay, saith the Lord" (Rom. 12:17-19 KJV). Solomon, whose name means peaceful, also gave us this advice, "Do not say, 'I'll pay you back for this wrong!' Wait for the Lord, and he will deliver you" (Prov. 20:22). Our nature says that people must be paid back their just due whether for evil or good. But God instructs us to leave the matter to him; he will right our cause and deal with those who treat us unjustly.


The Lord Our God


Jehovah versus Adonai. When Lord is in capital and small capital letters the word is Jehovah; otherwise the word is Adonai or Adon. When you read the Old Testament and see Lord, you are reading what in Hebrew is YHWH, Jehovah.


The name Adonai brings clarity to Christ's Sermon on the Mount. Jesus said, "Why do you call me, 'Lord, Lord,' and do not do what I say?" (Luke 6:46). "Not everyone who says to me, 'Lord, Lord,' will enter the kingdom of heaven, but only he who does the will of my Father who is in heaven" (Matt. 7:21-23). Lord is more than a word; it indicates a relationship. As this Scripture clearly indicates, the lordship of God means his total possession of us and our total submission to him as Lord and Master.


[INDEED  SO;  BUT  AGAIN  I  MUST  BRING  UP  THE  OBSERVING  OF  THE  WEEKLY  SABBATH;  IT’S  NOT  POSSIBLE  THE  4TH  COMMANDMENT  HAS  BEEN  CHISELED  OUT  OF  THE  TEN  COMMANDMENTS  -  Keith Hunt]


As Adonai, God has a right to expect obedience. This is why God became angry with Moses when he called him to go before Pharaoh and tell the ruler to let God's people go (Exod. 4:10-14). "Then Moses said to [Jehovah], 'Please, [Adonai,] I have never been eloquent, neither recently nor in time past, nor since You have spoken to Your servant; for I am slow of speech and slow of tongue.'. . . Then the anger of the Lord burned against Moses" (NASB). Why did God's anger burn? Because Moses was saying, "Lord, Lord [Adonai]," but not trusting or submitting to God as his Master.


Jesus as Lord (Adonai)—If God the Father is Lord, it is true also of God the Son. Jesus once asked the Pharisees, "'What do you think about the Christ? Whose son is he?' 'The son of David,' they replied. He said to them, 'How is it then that David, speaking by the Spirit, calls him "Lord"? For he says, "The Lord said to my Lord: 'Sit at my right hand until I put your enemies under your feet.'" If then David calls him "Lord," how can he be his son?' No one could say a word in reply, and from that day on no one dared to ask him any more questions" (Matt. 22:42-46).


Jesus claimed to be Adon. He quoted Psalm 110:1 to prove to the Pharisees that he was the Son of God. As Jesus quoted the psalm, he also established the fact that he was Adon. The verse reads in Hebrew, "Jehovah says to my Adon." In this passage, David was speaking prophetically of Christ, the Messiah.


[WHEN  THIS  VERSE  IS  REPEATED  BY  JESUS  IN  THE  NEW  TESTAMENT  IT  READS:  “THOES  SAID  TO  MY  THEOS……”  PROVING  BOTH  THE  FATHER  AND  SON  WERE  “GOD”  -  Keith Hunt]


"Lord" is a title translated from two words in the New Testament. Kyrios means supreme in authority, or controller. This is the most common word used in reference to Jesus Christ. The other is despotes, which means an absolute ruler, like a despot. "You call me 'Teacher' and 'Lord,' and rightly so, for that is what I am" (John 13:13; see Rom. 10:8-10). "Lord" is the one-word definition of God's sovereignty.

…………………


THE  WHOLE  OLD  TESTAMENT  AND  NEW  TESTAMENT  PROVE  ASSUREDLY  BOTH  PERSONS  IN  THE  GODHEAD  ARE  “GOD”  -  I  PROVE  THIS  IN  MANY  OTHER  STUDIES  UNDER  THIS  SECTION  ON  THIS  WEBSITE.  WHAT  CAN  BE  SAID  OF  THE  ONE  CAN  BE  SAID  OF  THE  OTHER.  THERE  IS  UNITY  AND  EQUALITY  IN  BOTH  THE  FATHER  AND  SON;  THERE  IS  ONLY  ONE  DIFFERENCE——  THE  FATHER  IS  THE  TOP  PERSON  WITH  AUTHORITY;  HE  WILL  EVER  BE  THE  SUPREME  ONE  WITH  MOST  AUTHORITY  OVER  EVERYONE  ELSE.  THAT  IS  VERY  CLEAR  FROM  THE  GOSPELS  AND  FROM  THE  WRITINGS  OF  PAUL  AND  ALL  THE  APOSTLES;  THAT  IS  CLEAR  FROM  ALL  THE  VISIONS  PEOPLE  SAW  OF  THE  HEAVENLY  THRONE—— IT  IS  GOD  THE  FATHER [THE  ANCIENT  OF  DAYS]  SITTING  ON  THE  THRONE  OF  HEAVEN,  WITH  JESUS  THE  CHRIST,  NOT  ON  TOP  OF  HIM,  NOT  INSIDE  OF  HIM,  BUT  SITTING  AT  HIS  RIGHT  HAND  SIDE  -  Keith Hunt