AS  I  WAS  STUDYING  A  PART  OF  A  BOOK  I  HAVE  ON  DIFFICULTIES  IN  THE  BIBLE,  I  CAME  ACROSS  THIS  QUESTION  AND  ANSWER——



In the light of his dealings with Bathsheba and her husband, Uriah, how could David be regarded by the Lord as a servant whose heart was "perfect" before Him (cf. 1 Kings 11:4; 15:3; Acts 13:22)? 


Even before David became king of Israel, he had committed several sins and offenses to his discredit. His deception of the high priest Ahimelech resulted in the massacre of nearly every priest in the city of Nob by the agents of King Saul, even though they were completely unaware of David's status as a wanted fugitive (1 Sam. 21-22). Later on, as a vassal of King Achish of Gath, David systematically deceived him as to the various tribes and communities his warriors had raided in their forays from Ziklag; and he was willing to put every one of his victims to death in order to keep the truth about his activities from getting back to Achish (1 Sam. 27:8-12). His affair with Uriah's wife, Bathsheba, and the subsequent cover-up that he engineered by having Uriah killed in battle before the walls of Rabbath Amrnon (2 Sam. 11) were by no means the only shameful blots on his record, even though they are doubtless the best known.


From these considerations it is quite apparent that David did not gain God's favor or approval because of a sinless life. Although his conduct was for the most part exemplary and his courage and ability as a leader beyond comparison, it was not because of these things that he especially pleased God. It was rather because of his tremendous faith in the power and grace of God that his heart was adjudged to be salem (KJV, "perfect"; NASB, "wholly devoted"; NIV, "fully devoted") with Yahweh his God (1 Kings 11:4; 15:3). The adjective salem basically means "complete, whole, sound, finished" or even "at peace with ['im] someone." (The word is cognate with solom, "peace, welfare.") That is, David's heart was all there for God, and God was his very reason for living. Many of his psalms eloquently express his deep attachment to the Lord, his joy in fellowship with God, and his complete trust in His redeeming power.


Furthermore, David could never remain out of fellowship with God for very long. Psalm 32 reveals what unbearable agony he went through after the affair with Bathsheba, until finally the prophet Nathan came to him and condemned his crimes in the name of Yahweh (2 Sam. 12:7-10). A lesser man would have flared up against this daring prophet and had him put to death. But one of the greatest assets in David's character was his ability to receive rebuke, to acknowledge his utter sinfulness (cf. Ps. 51:3-5), and to cast himself on the mercy of God to forgive him, cleanse him, and restore him to holy fellowship once more.


The believer who can face guilt and failure in the way David did is in a profound sense a man after God's own heart—the kind that God told Samuel He was going to look for after Saul had forfeited favor by his disobedience (1 Sam. 13:14). David was that kind of a son and servant to the Lord; he was an 'is kilebabo ("a man according to His heart"). As such he became a model for all believers to follow, in regard to wholehearted commitment to pleasing the Lord, obeying His word, and furthering the cause of His kingdom on earth. God could trust him with great responsibility and consistent victory on the battlefield because David's central  purpose  was to  glorify God, not to glorify or please himself. 


Recalling these dominant traits in David's life, the apostle Paul commended him to the congregation in Antioch Pisidiae, saying: "And after He had removed him [Saul], He raised up David to be their king, concerning whom He also testified and said, 'I have found David the son of Jesse, a man after My heart [kata ten kardian mou], who will do all My will" (Acts 13:22, NASB). 


The glory of God, the will of God, and the loving fellowship of God were what mattered most to King David, even though there were temporary lapses in that relationship. But even after he had fallen into sin and failure, David knew how to trust God's grace and forgiving love enough to confess and forsake his iniquity in an attitude of true repentance so as to get back in step with the Lord on the highway of holiness. Such a believer is certain to be a man or woman after God's own heart!...END QUOTE


IT  IS  THE  TRUTH  OF  THE  MAN  AND  KING  OF  ISRAEL— DAVID.


IT  SHOULD  GIVE  US  ALL  INSPIRATION  FOR  THE  CHRISTIAN  WAY  OF  LIFE.  IN  DAVID’S  SITUATION  BECAUSE  HE  WAS  KING  OF  ISRAEL,  HIS  SINS  WOULD  HAVE  OR  COULD  HAVE  A  MORE  SERIOUS  CONSEQUENCE,  THAN  THE  SINS  OF  THE  AVERAGE  MAN  ON  THE  STREET  SHALL  WE  SAY.  HENCE  HIS  PENALTY  FOR  THOSE  SINS  HAD  A  BROADER  PATH.


WE  SEE  THAT  GOD  IS  NO  RESPECTER  OF  PERSONS;  HE  JUDGES  RIGHTEOUSLY.  IT  MATTERS  NOT  THAT  YOU  ARE  “A  NOBODY”  OR  A  “SOMEBODY”—— GOD  JUDGES  RIGHTLY  AND  FAIRLY  WITH  EVERYONE.


WHAT  IS  INSPIRING  TO  SEE  IS  THAT  NO  MATTER  WHAT  YOUR  SINS,  UPON  TRUE  DEEP  REPENTANCE,  YOU  CAN  BE  FORGIVEN.  THERE  IS  NO  SIN  THAT  GOD  CANNOT  WASH  AWAY  IN  THE  BLOOD  OF  OUR  SAVIOR  JESUS  THE  CHRIST,  UPON  OUR  ADMITTANCE  TO  THE  SIN,  AND  OUR  WHOLEHEARTED  REPENTANCE.


WITH  THAT  REPENTANCE  COMES  OUR  MIND-SET  OF  WANTING  TO  KNOW  GOD’S  WAYS,  HIS  RIGHTEOUSNESS—— WANTING  TO  LOVE  THE  WAY  OF  GOD  AND  TO  DO  THE  WAY  OF  GOD.


THIS  WAS  THE  MIND-SET  OF  DAVID—— WE  SEE  HIS  MIND-SET  IN  PSALM  51  AND  PSALM  1,  AS  WELL  AS  PSLAM  23.


THIS  IS  TO  BE  OUR  MIND-SET.


SO  HAVING,  GOD  WILL  ALSO  SAY  TO  US,  YOU  ARE  A  PERSON  AFTER  MY  OWN  HEART.  


Keith hunt