ALLEGED  CONTRADICTIONS  OF  THE  BIBLE  #9


2. Duty of Man—To Himself


Anger


Approved.


Be ye angry, and sin not: let not the sun go down upon your wrath.

                                            Ephesians 4:26




Condemned.


Make no friendship with an angry man; and with a furious man thou shalt not go. 

                                                                       Proverbs 22:24 



Be not hasty in thy spirit to be angry: for anger resteth in the bosom of fools. 

                                                                        Ecclesiastes 7:9 



Slow to wrath: for the wrath of man worketh not the righteousness of God.

James 1:19-20



Paul, says Alford, "speaks of anger which is an infirmity, but by being cherished may become a sin."

Bishop Butler:55 "The first text is by no means to be understood as an encouragement to indulge ourselves in anger; the sense being certainly this, 'Though ye be angry, sin not'; yet here is evidently a distinction made between anger and sin—between the natural passion and sinful anger."

The last clause hits the point precisely. There is a normal indignation, which is evoked by exhibitions of meanness, treachery, and injustice, and which may, within certain limits, be indulged without sin. This emotion is to be distinguished from those furious and unreasonable ebullitions of wrath which characterize a passionate man.



Animal food



Use unrestricted.


Every moving thing that liveth shall be

meat for you.

Genesis 9:3

There is nothing unclean of itself.

Romans 14:14


Whatsoever is sold in the shambles, that eat, asking no question for conscience sake.

                                                    1 Corinthians 10:25


Restricted.


Nevertheless these ye shall not eat of them that chew the cud, or of them that divide the cloven hoof. . . . They are unclean unto you.

Deuteronomy 14:7



The first three passages refer to men not under the Mosaic law. Deuteronomy 14 was addressed to the Israelites whom God, for wise reasons, wished to keep a distinct race.


VERY  BAD  ANSWER:  THE  TRUTH  OF  CLEAN  AND  UNCLEAN  FOODS  IS  ALL  EXPOUNDED  ON  THIS  WEBSITE  UNDER  "HEALTH"  SECTION.  THE  ABOVE  VERSES  ALL  EXPLAINED  -  Keith Hunt

55 Sermon viii.



Dr. Davidson:56 "It is apparent that the effect of these enactments respecting different beasts as proper for food or otherwise must have been to keep the Hebrews apart from other nations; that, as a distinct people, they might be preserved from idolatry. If certain articles of food common among other races were interdicted, the effect would be to break up social intercourse between them; by which means the Jews would not be in so much danger of learning their barbarous customs, and falling into their superstitions. Thus the separation of meats into clean and unclean was most salutary to a monotheistic people, set apart as the chosen depositaries of the knowledge of God, and exposed on every side to polytheistic tribes."57


A  BAD  ANSWER  IN  THE  OVERALL.  REALLY  SHOWS  HOW  DUMB  SOME  THEOLOGIANS  ARE  WHEN  IT  COMES  TO  THE  DIETRY  LAWS  OF  GOD.  ALL  EXPLAINED  IN  DETAIL  UNDER  MY  "HEALTH"  SECTION  -  Keith Hunt


Certain animals forbidden.


And every creeping thing that flieth

is unclean unto you: they shall not be

eaten.

                                                   Deuteronomy 14:19



Same allowed.


These may ye eat of every flying creeping thing that goeth upon all four, which have legs above their feet, to leap withal upon the earth. . . . But all other flying creeping things, which have four feet, shall be an abomination unto you. 

                                                 

                                                                      Leviticus 11:21, 23



Keil: "The edible kinds of locusts are passed over, in Deuteronomy 14, because it was not the intention of Moses to repeat every particular of the earlier laws in these addresses." In the rapid outline given in Deuteronomy it was not practicable to notice unimportant exceptions.



Boasting


Tolerated.


I laboured more abundantly than they all: yet not I, but the grace of God which was with me.

                                                   1 Corinthians 15:10


That which I speak, I speak it not after

the Lord, but as it were foolishly, in

this  confidence  of boasting.   Seeing

that many glory after the flesh, I will

glory also.

                                                  2 Corinthians 11:17-18


In nothing am I behind the very chief-est apostles, though I be nothing.

                                                   2 Corinthians 12:11



Repudiated.


Let another man praise thee, and not

thine own mouth.

Proverbs 27:2


That no flesh should glory in his presence.

1 Corinthians 1:29


56Introd. to Old Testament, i. 258.

57Difference of national customs furnishes the solution of several alleged "discrepancies."
For example, the wearing of long hair by men is allowed in Numbers 6:5, and repudiated in 1 Corinthians 11:14. But, then, the first passage refers to Jews, the second is addressed to Greeks at Corinth. Among the former, the wearing of long hair was counted honor able, even ornamental, rather than otherwise; among the latter, it indicated effeminacy and the indulgence of unnatural vices. See Stuart, Hist, of Canon of Old Testament, p. 375
(Revised edition, p. 351).


NUMBERS 6:5 IS FOR THOSE UNDER A NAZARITE VOW FOR A PERIOD OF TIME, AND HAS NOTHING TO DO WITH A PERMANENT  LIFE  STYLE.  1 COR.11:14  CONCERNS A WAY OF PHYSICALLY  LIVING  ON  A  PERMANENT  BASIS. THE  IDEA  ABOVE  #57  IS  THEOLOGICALLY  INEPT  -  Keith Hunt



The limiting clauses, "not I, but the grace of God," "though I be nothing," and the like, show that it was not self-conceit which impelled Paul to "boast" or "glory."

Andrew Fuller,58 comparing the texts from Proverbs and Corinthians, says: "The motive in the one case is the desire of applause; in the other, justice to an injured character and to the gospel which suffered in his reproaches." His apparent boasting was in self-vindication.

"No flesh should glory"—none should find in the gospel occasion for pride and self-exaltation. Paul did not "glory" thus carnally.



Paul unsurpassed.


For I suppose I was not a whit behind

the very chiefest apostles.

2 Corinthians 11:5


For he that wrought effectually in Peter to the apostleship of the circumcision, the same was mighty in me toward the Gentiles.

Galatians 2:8



Humblest of apostles.


For I am the least of the apostles, that am not meet to be called an apostle, because I persecuted the church of God.

1 Corinthians 15:9


Unto me, who am less than the least of all saints, is this grace given, that I should preach among the Gentiles the unsearchable riches of Christ.

Ephesians 3:8



These passages present the apostle in two distinct aspects.

In respect to his talents, his education, and his missionary zeal and labors he was unmistakably primus inter pares, first among his equals of the apostolic rank. But he, unlike the other apostles, had been, before his conversion, a fierce and bloody enemy of Christianity, who "beyond measure persecuted the church of God and wasted it."59 In his deep sorrow, shame, and humiliation at the remembrance of his former deeds of cruelty, he expresses himself in the language of the second series of texts. The two series contemplate the apostle in entirely different relations.



Moses' self-praise.


Moreover the man Moses was very great in the land of Egypt, in the sight of Pharaoh's servants, and in the sight of the people.

Exodus 11:3


Now the man Moses was very meek, above all the men which were upon the face of the earth.

Numbers 12:3



Self-praise unworthy.


It is not good to eat much honey: so

for men to search their own glory is not

glory.

Proverbs 25:27

58Works, i. 676.

59Compare Galatians 1:13; Acts 9:1.



The quotation from Exodus is the statement of a simple historical fact. It says nothing of Moses' greatness in respect to personal qualifications, but simply asserts—what is beyond the shadow of doubt—that his miracles had produced a great effect, and had made a deep impression upon the Egyptians. And this statement is introduced not to glorify Moses, but to account in part for the ready compliance of the Egyptians in bestowing upon the Israelites the "jewels" and "raiment" which the latter demanded.

The text from Numbers has by some critics been deemed an interpolation. Others give a different translation of the Hebrew term rendered "meek." Luther says, "harassed or annoyed"; Dr. A. Clarke, "depressed"; Palfrey, "miserable"; Dean Stanley, "enduring, afflicted, heedless of self"; Smith's Bible Dictionary, "disinterested."

There is, however, no need of recourse to these definitions. Moses, under the impulse of the Holy Spirit, was writing history "objectively." Hence he speaks of himself as freely as he would of any other person. It is also to be observed that he records his own faults and sins 60 with the same fidelity and impartiality. It is remarked by Calmet: "As he praises himself here without pride, so he will blame himself elsewhere with humility." The objectionable words were inserted to explain why it was that Moses took no steps in the case to vindicate himself, and why, consequently, the Lord so promptly intervened.



Coveting


Enjoined.


Covet earnestly the best gifts.

                                                    1 Corinthians 12:31


Wherefore, brethren, covet to prophesy. 

                                                                     1 Corinthians 14:39



Forbidden.


Thou shalt not covet. . . any thing that

is thy neighbour's.

Exodus 20:17



"Covet," in the first two texts, implies an earnest desire for that which is legitimately within our reach; in the last, it denotes an unlawful craving for that which properly belongs to another.


Human effort


Encouraged.


So run, that ye may obtain.

1 Corinthians 9:24



Depreciated.


So then it is not of him that willeth, nor of him that runneth, but of God that showeth mercy.

Romans 9:16


60See Exodus 4:24; Numbers 20:12; Deuteronomy 1:37.



The latter text teaches that the providing of salvation was God's act, and not attributable to mans "willing" nor "running"—the act of sovereign grace, and not of the creature. The former teaches that the securing of this salvation to the individual depends upon his own exertion. God's mercy in furnishing redemption and mans effort in availing himself of that redemption are the cardinal ideas presented in the two texts.



Idol-meats


Non-essential.


But meat commendeth us not to God: for neither, if we eat, are we the better; neither, if we eat not, are we the worse. 


                                                                       1 Corinthians 8:8


What say I then? that the idol is any thing, or that which is offered in sacrifice to idols is any thing?

                                                    1 Corinthians 10:19



To be avoided.


The things which the Gentiles sacrifice, they sacrifice to devils, and not to God: and I would not that ye should have fellowship with devils. Ye cannot drink the cup of the Lord, and the cup of devils: ye cannot be partakers of the Lord's table, and of the table of devils. 


                                                                 1 Corinthians 10:20-21



In the first series, Paul concedes that meat is not affected by being offered in sacrifice to idols, and that the eating of it is in itself, a matter of indifference. But he argues, in the eighth chapter,61 that Christians should refrain from this food, because their participation would be misconstrued by other persons and, in the tenth chapter,62 because the participant shares, to some extent, in the sin of idolatry.

Andrew Fuller:63 Your course is inexpedient, because it leads others into actual idolatry; it is also positively sinful, because it involves a participation in idol worship, on the general principle that he who voluntarily associates with others in any act is a partaker of that act.


I  EXPLAIN  IT  ALL  FULLER  IN  THOSE  BOOKS  UNDER  "THE  NEW  TESTAMENT  BIBLE  STORY"  ON  THIS  WEBSITE  -  Keith Hunt


Laughter


Commended.


A merry heart doeth good like a medicine.

Proverbs 17:22


A time to every purpose under the heaven. ... A time to laugh.


Ecclesiastes 3:1, 4


I commended mirth, because a man hath no better thing under the sun, than to eat, and to drink, and to be merry.

Ecclesiates 8:15



Condemned.


I said of laughter, It is mad: and of

mirth, What doeth it?

Ecclesiastes 2:2


Sorrow is better than laughter: for by the sadness of the countenance the heart is made better. The heart of the wise is in the house of mourning; but the heart of fools is in the house of mirth.


Ecclesiastes 7:3-4

61See verses 9-13.

62Verses 20, 21.

63Works, i. 683-684.



I will see you again, and your heart shall rejoice, and your joy no man taketh from you.

John 16:22


Woe unto you that laugh now! for ye shall mourn and weep.


Luke 6:25



The first texts speak approvingly of a cheerful spirit or a seasonable and rational merriment; the second condemn senseless and riotous hilarity. Hengstenberg: "Mirth considered as the highest good, as the end of life, and the too great eagerness displayed in its pursuit." Not laughter in the abstract, but laughter under certain circumstances, is condemned.



Man's own way


Must not be followed. 


Remember all the commandments of the Lord, and do them; and that ye seek not after your own heart and your own eyes.

Numbers 15:39



May be followed,


Rejoice, O young man, in thy youth;

and let thy heart cheer thee in the days

of thy youth, and walk in the ways of

thine heart, and in the sight of thine

eyes.

Ecclesiastes 11:9



Menasseh ben Israel, Aben Ezra, and Rashi take the second text as ironical: "Well, go your own way, but remember," etc. Ginsburg, Hengstenberg, and Zockler deem it an injunction to enjoy cheerfully the blessings of life, and, at the same time, to bear in mind man's accountability to the Giver of every good and perfect gift.


Mourning


Commended.


Blessed are they that mourn: for they

shall be comforted.


                                                                                Matthew 5:4

Discountenanced.


Rejoice in the Lord alway: and again I

say, Rejoice.

                                                                             Philippians 4:4



The "mourning" is that attendant upon true penitence; the "rejoicing" results from the assurance of salvation. The sorrow precedes, the joy follows, pardon.


Purity


In a preceding part of this work 64 we have discussed at some length, and at one view, the alleged discrepancies which would properly come under this head.

See pp. 144-146.


Salvation


God's work.


For God is my King of old, working

salvation in the midst of the earth.

Psalm 74:12



Man's work.


Work out your own salvation with fear and trembling. For it is God which worketh in you both to will and to do of bis good pleasure.


Philippians 2:12-13



The last verse at the right represents God as the prime mover in the work of salvation. Alford: "We owe both the will to do good and the power to his indwelling Spirit." As has been previously said, the divine and human agencies cooperate to a certain extent.65



Strong drink


Use recommended.


And thou shalt bestow that money for whatsoever thy soul lusteth after, for oxen, or for sheep, or for wine, or for strong drink.


                                                   Deuteronomy 14:26


And the vine said unto them, Should I leave my wine, which cheereth God and man.

Judges 9:13


Wine that maketh glad the heart of man.

Psalm 104:15


Give strong drink unto him that is ready to perish, and wine unto those that be of heavy hearts. Let him drink, and forget his poverty, and remember his misery no more.

Proverbs 31:6-7


Drink no longer water, but use a little wine for thy stomach's sake and thine often infirmities.

1 Timothy 5:23



Discountenanced.


Wine is a mocker, strong drink is raging: and whosoever is deceived thereby is not wise.

Proverbs 20:1


Who hath woe? who hath sorrow? who hath contentions? who hath babbling? who hath wounds without cause? who hath redness of eyes? They that tarry long at the wine; they that go to seek mixed wine. Look not thou upon the wine when it is red, when it giveth his colour in the cup, when it moveth itself aright. At the last it biteth like a serpent, and stingeth like an adder.

Proverbs 23:29-32


Whoredom and wine and new wine take away the heart.

Hosea4:11


Nor drunkards, nor revilers, nor extortioners, shall inherit the kingdom of God.

1 Corinthians 6:10



For an extended discussion of this point the reader is referred to the literature of the subject. It should, however, be said that the general tenor of the Bible is clearly and decidedly against intemperance.

Noahs intoxication 66—a sad blot upon a character otherwise without reproach—is related merely as a matter of history, and without comment.


THIS  SUBJECT  IS  COVERED  IN-DEPTH  BY  MYSELF  ON  THIS  WEBSITE  -  Keith Hunt

65Compare pp. 166-167 of present work.

66Genesis 9:21.



As to the miracle at Cana,67 there is nothing in the act of our Savior, nor in the circumstances of the case, which goes to sanction drunkenness.

Certain authors maintain, with some plausibility, that in all cases where strong drinks are coupled with terms of commendation, the original word properly means either unfermented wine or the fruit; and that the notices of fermented wine are restricted to passages of a condemnatory character. This position, if tenable, is one of great importance. For the discussion of this point, we have already referred to the literature of the subject.68


THIS  IDEA  IS  A  COP-OUT  FOR  THOSE  WHO  ARE  SO  STRONGLY  AGAINST  ANY  USE  OF  ALCOHOLIC  BEVERAGES,  AND  SO  THEIR  ATTITUDE  IS  AS  ABOVE.  ALL  OF  THAT  IDEA  AND  TEACHING  I  DEBUNK  ON  THIS  WEBSITE  IN DETAIL  -  Keith Hunt


In the quotation from Deuteronomy the words rendered "wine" and "strong drink" may not imply here fermented or intoxicating liquors. Even if such be their meaning, the passage does not sanction the use of these drinks to the extent of ebriety.


SO  "STRONG  DRINK"  IS  THEN  COCA-COLA  OR  7-UP  OR  MAYBE  ROOT-BEAR?  RIDICULOUS  IDEAS.  THE  JEWS  HAVE  IN  ALL  THEIR  HISTORY  NEVER  THOUGHT  OR  TAUGHT  THAT  THE  BIBLE  CONDEMNS  TO  DRINK  ANY  ALCOHOL.  THEY  HAVE  ALWAYS  USED  AND  DRANK  FERMENTED  WINE  -  Keith Hunt


Judges 9:13 appears in the sacred record, as a mere fable, with which the uninspired speaker embellished his harangue.

The text in Psalms speaks of "wine" which "maketh glad" the heart of man, and of "bread" which "strengtheneth" it. These two terms apparently stand, by metonymy, for food and drink. Hengstenberg: "What appeases hunger and thirst." It is not an intoxicating drink which is contemplated here.


AND  IT  ALSO  COULD  BE  JUST  AS  IT  IS:  ALCOHOL  DOES  IN  MODERATION  MAKE  THE  HEART  GLAD;  AND  GOOD  WHOLE  ORGANIC  FLOUR  OF  DIFFERENT  KINDS  TO  MAKE  BREAD,  DOES  GIVE  US  STRENGTH  TO  THE  HEART  -  Keith Hunt


The passage in Proverbs 31 points to a medicinal use of the articles in question. In verses 4 and 5 of the same chapter the use of "wine" and "strong drink" is forbidden, for a specified reason, to "kings" and "princes." It is then added: "Give strong drink unto him that is ready to perish [Zockler: who is on the point of perishing, who is just expiring], and wine unto those that be of heavy hearts." The language indicates persons in a state of great depression and exhaustion.


AND  SO  ALCOHOL  IT  MUST  BE;  PESPSI-COLA  OR  DR.PEPPER  WOULD  HARDLY  HELP  THE  HEAVY  HEART.  WHEN  THE  PRIEST  WAS  TO  PERFORM  HIS  DUTY  HE  WAS  TO  REFRAIN  FROM  WINE - ALCOHOL;  SO  IN  FULFILLING  THE  OFFICE  OF  LEADERS  LIKE   IN  OLD  DAYS,  THE  KING,  AND  PRINCES,  TODAY  OUR  PRESIDENTS  AND  PRIME-MINISTERS  AND  OTHER  OFFICIALS  IN  HIGH  PLACES, WHEN  HAVING  TO  MAKE  SERIOUS  DECISIONS,  SHOULD  REFRAIN  FROM  ALCOHOL  -  Keith Hunt


That Paul's direction to Timothy also contemplates a strictly medical use of wine is beyond a shadow of doubt. The conclusion is that the sacred writers are* not apologists for drunkenness, and neither directly nor indirectly countenance it.


INDEED,  WHAT  GOOD  WOULD  SOFT-DRINKS  OR  EVEN  GRAPE  JUICE [SOME  WOULD  PROBABLY  ARGUE  FOR  THIS]  DO  FOR  A  LONG  TERM  STOMACH  PROBLEM  -  Keith Hunt



Temptation


Desirable.


My brethren, count it all joy when ye

fall into divers temptations.

James 1:2


Undesirable.


Lead us not into temptation.

Matthew 6:13

67 John 2:1-11.

68 Compare Smith's Bib. Diet., "Wine"; also, Lees and Burns' "Temperance Bible Commentary" (American edition, New York, 1870). A writer in Fairbairn's Imperial Bible Diet, says, that [Hebrew given] properly means vintage fruit, a solid, instead of a liquid; that [Hebrew given] means syrup from
various fruits not intoxicating when new. Fuerst takes [Hebrew] with [Hebrew] Jeremiah 40:10, as denoting bunches of grapes. Cassell's Bible Diet, says that with the exception of [Hebrew] and perhaps of [Hebrew], the other original terms are not used in connection with drunkenness. But see [Hebrew]
in Hosea 4:11, above.



The word rendered "temptations," says Alford, means "not only what we properly call temptations, but any kind of distresses which happen to us, from without or from within, which in God's purpose serve as trials of us." Matthew inculcates "a humble self-distrust and shrinking from such trials in the prospect"; James teaches that when they do providentially overtake us, we are to rejoice that even these things shall work together for our good.


"LEAD  US  NOT  INTO  TEMPTATION"  IS  COVERED  FULLY  IN  MY  STUDIES  ON  PRAYER  ON  THIS  WEBSITE  -  Keith Hunt



Wealth


Not to be retained.


If thou wilt be perfect, go and sell that thou hast, and give to the poor, and thou shalt have treasure in heaven.

Matthew 19:21


As many as were possessors of lands or houses sold them, and brought the prices of the things that were sold, and laid them down at the apostles' feet.

Acts 4:34-35


They that will be rich fall into temptation and a snare, and into many foolish and hurtful lusts, which drown men in destruction and perdition. For the love of money is the root of all evil.

1 Timothy 6:9-10



May be retained.


Charge  them that  are  rich  in this world, that they be not high-minded, nor trust in uncertain riches. . . . That they do good, that they be rich in good works, ready to distribute, willing to communicate.

1 Timothy 6:17-18



The young ruler's was an exceptional case. His "great possessions" were his idol; love of money was his great sin. Jesus shaped the injunction to meet this special case; aiming, as always, at the besetting sin of the individual. The only legitimate inference is that every sin, even the most cherished, must be given up, if we would be disciples of Christ.

Of the example in Acts, Alford says that it was a voluntary one, was enforced nowhere by any rule, and that it prevailed only at Jerusalem. Hackett: "The community of goods, as it existed in the church at Jerusalem, was purely a voluntary thing, and not required by the apostles."

Not those who "are rich," but those who "will 69 be rich," those who make riches the great object of life, are admonished by the apostle in 1 Timothy 6. The excessive love, rather than the mere possession, of wealth, is the object of reprimand. The Bible forbids neither the acquisition nor the possession of wealth, provided we hold it as God's stewards, and use it for his glory.

69 Alford brings out the force of the original word, thus: "They who wish to berich."


Wisdom


Unprofitable.


For in much wisdom is much grief: and

he that increaseth knowledge increas-

eth sorrow.

Ecclesiastes 1:18

As it happeneth to the fool, so it hap-

peneth even to me; and why was I then

more wise?

Ecclesiastes 2:15

For what hath the wise more than the

fool?

                                                                               Ecclesiastes 6:8


This  wisdom   descendeth   not   from 

above, but is earthly, sensual, devilish.

James 3:15



Of great value.


Wisdom excelleth folly, as far as light

excelleth darkness.

Ecclesiastes 2:13


Happy is the man that findeth wisdom, 

and the man that getteth understanding.... 

She is more precious than rubies: 

and all the things thou canst desire are 

not to be compared unto her. 

                                                                         Proverbs 3:13,15


The wisdom that is from above is first

pure, then peaceable, . . . full of mercy

and good fruits.

James 3:17



The term "wisdom" is applied, in the scriptures, to at least three things: 1. Worldly craft, cunning, or policy; 2. Mere human knowledge or learning; 3. Enlightened piety. The first is always disapproved; the second, having in itself no moral quality, is not condemned save when it usurps the place of the third kind, or enlightened piety. The latter is invariably commended. In the case before us ethical wisdom is contrasted with carnal wisdom.


CERTAINLY  KNOWLEDGE  AND  WISDOM  OF  THIS  WORLD  BRINGS  ALSO  GRIEF.  IF  YOU  KNOW  ABOUT  THE  THINGS  THAT  SADLY  GO  ON  IN  THE  WORLD,  THAT  BRINGS  SORROW  AND  PAIN  AND  SUFFERING,  YOU  ARE  PARTAKERS  OF  THE  SADNESS.  THOSE  WHO  WORK  DIRECTLY  IN  JOBS  TO  DO  WITH  ACCIDENTS,  STARVATION,  PLAGUES,  SEE  AND  KNOW  MORE  SORROW  THAN  THOSE  OF  US  WHO  SEE  NONE  OR  VERY  VERY  LITTLE  OF  THESE  SORROWS  OF  THE  WORLD.

AND  THERE  IS  A  WORLDLY  WISDOM  THAT  LEADS  TO  PRIDE,  AND  DECEPTION  FROM  THE  TRUTHS  OF  GOD.

WISDOM  THAT  IS  FROM  GOD  IS  TRULY  LIKE  PEARS  OF  GREAT  PRICE,  AND  MORE  PRECIOUS  THAN  RUBIES,  AND  ALL  THE  GOLD  IN  THE  WORLD;  IT  DOES  INDEED  GIVE  PEACE,  MERCY,  GOOD  FRUITS,  AND  INHERITANCE  IN  THE  KINGDOM  OF  GOD  -  Keith Hunt