MODERN  HISTORY  OF  THE  7TH  DAY  CHURCHES  OF  GOD  #18



The Post Merger Period, 1949    Present


1950:  New Church Buildings, Travels of Marrs


A new church building at the headquarters in Denver was dedicated on March 4, 1950 by Elder Frank Walker. Among post-merger developments was the construction of several new church buildings over the country, one of which was the Los Angeles church, pastored by Elder Carl Stacey.


Elder Burt Marrs soon replaced A.N. Dugger as head of the Foreign Missions Department and made a two-month trip to Jamaica and Trinidad in the summer of 1950, finding that the brethren there really were "God's people."  Later in the year, Marrs went to Mexico, and attended a conference in Mexico City. There were reported to be some 120 churches of God in Mexico at that time.   President of their Conference was Elder Jose Kim Peck.


Mexico the Center of a Tug of War


The February 27, 1950 Advocate reveals that the Churches of God (Seventh Day) of Mexico were well organized, never had any cleft or division, but considered themselves closer to Salem than Stanberry.


Alberto Garcia reported that there were 91 churches there.


The same issue also reported that a few scattered people were not going along with the merger. But James Merriam wrote that he was firmly with the merger.


As noted previously, Salem had done considerable work in Mexico previous to the 1949 merger.  Mexico, though, had had little contact with the headquarters of the Church of God in the United States. Some Mexican ministers were chosen for the Salem group's 12, 7 and 70, but they served in name only, since there was little or no contact with them.


Dugger and others did not long remain with the Merger;  in March of 1950 they launched the "Back to Salem" movement, and sought to draw the entire Mexican work behind them.


Straub, though with Salem, was the strongest advocate of the merger.


He went to Mexico in 1948 and again in 1949, in an effort to counteract the possibility of losing the Mexican churches to the "Back to Salem" people. "He apparently succeeded in overcoming Dugger's "lying literature" and organized the Mexican work in 1949.  Marrs' trip of 1950 appears to be also spurred by the Mexican conflict.


"Back to Salem" Movement of 1950


Besides Dugger, there were other key figures in the "Back to Salem" movement.   It may have been as early as 1949 when F. L. Summers and his son-in-law Chris   Royer went back to Salem and established headquarters there. Royer was married to Summers' daughter, who apparently was divorced previously. The Merger Group held firmly that no one could be divorced and remarried, or married to a divorcee, and still be a minister. Members who are divorced and remarried before they come into the church are allowed. But no divorce except for adultery is allowed after one is in the church. The "divorce and remarriage" issue is thus seen as a major reason why some went "Back to Salem."


Another dissident was M.L. Bartholomew, who was in Oregon at the time

and tried to push "Back to Salem" ideas in Harrisburg and Marion.


He and Dugger told lies to get people to go against the Merger, according to Straub.  In 1950, Straub traveled the country seeking to stop the "Back to Salem" movement, and did succeed in getting most of the people to support the Merger, at least for a time. Straub maintains that he heard from Dugger himself that Dugger believed it was all right once in a while to tell a lie if it was to the benefit of the church.


Robert A. Barnes reports that Summers, a native of Salem, never did go along with the Merger. The Merger Group sued him for the publishing building in Salem, and he beat them, thus all the Merger Group's papers had to be printed at Stanberry.  Barnes  (one  of the Twelve of the Salem Group) went along with the Merger for a short time, but left because he did not like the "German leaders" such as Marrs, Charles Adams, and Straub. He said that in the Stanberry park he heard Straub say that when they got in power they would change a few things, and even allow pork. Barnes felt that the Merger Group's organization was a "dictatorship."


NOTE -  "SUED"  -  TOTALLY  AGAINST  WHAT  PAUL  TAUGHT,  THAT  NO  BROTHER  TAKE  BROTHER  TO  COURT;  THEN  AGAIN  SOME  THINK  YOUR  NOT  A  BROTHER  IF  YOUR  ON  THE  "WRONG  SIDE"  -  Keith Hunt


Salem apparently established a Bible School about the same time the one in Stanberry was begun.  One of its students that later became a minister was Martin L. Ogren, who was attending in 1952.


Breaks in the "Back to Salem" Movement


The "Back to Salem" movement broke into at least three factions, (1) the original Salem people who stayed at Salem with it as headquarters,  (2)   Dugger and Severson, who went to Jerusalem, and (3) Olson and Groshans, who formed the Seventh Day Church of God in Caldwell, Idaho.


Original Salem Group Continues


Summers, Royer and Bartholomew stayed with Salem. M.L. Bartholomew is said to preach to a substantial church in Cleveland, and there is at least one other Salem church, in Parma, Idaho where Otis Home is pastor.  The group publishes a magazine, The Advocate of Truth, which probably began in February of 1950.   On its masthead is the caption, "Come out of her, my people."  The Staff in 1971 consisted of Chris W. Royer, editor; John F. Curran, managing editor;  Kenneth

C. Summers, associate editor;  M. L. Bartholomew, contributing editor; and Heidi De Long, children's page editor.


The 1971 Yearbook of American Churches states that the Church of God  (Seventh Day) of Salem has an apostolic council which meets bi-yearly in Salem, on the first Sunday in January, and July.  Headquarters is 79 Water Street, Box 328, Salem, West Virginia, 26426. Bartholomew is current chairman of the Apostolic Council, with Chris W. Royer secretary. John F. Curran, Senior is chairman of the Board of Financial Stewards.


REMEMBER  THE  LAST  SENTENCE  IS  WHEN  NICKELS  WAS  WRITING  THIS  BOOK  -  1973  -  Keith Hunt


Salem is purported to believe that the saints will be raptured to the sea of glass while the seven last plagues will be poured out. The 1971 figures given for Salem show 7 churches, 9 ministers, and 2000 members, and also 15 Sabbath Schools, 100 teachers and 3000 students.


Dugger and Severson:  On to Jerusalem


In September, 1952, Dugger had just returned to Oregon from an extended trip to Nigeria, where, with five native ministers and Elder A.C. Olson of Wisconsin, he rode bicycles through the jungles visiting groups of Church of God people.   The whole family upon the return had contracted typhoid fever. All recovered through anointing and prayer, except Dugger's wife, Effie. The hospital in Portland said she would die, and Dugger and his two young daughters prayed all night, Dugger vowing that if God would heal her, he would sell all of his belonging and go to Jerusalem.  Dugger recalls, "I had many times definitely felt the urge to go to Jerusalem and publish a paper there, but had made excuses." Effie did recover, and Dugger sold his place in Oregon and took the family to Jerusalem, starting The Mount Zion Reporter in 1953. His address became P.O. Box 568, Jerusalem, Israel, and he reports that his office miraculously survived the 1967 Jew-Arab war.


Possibly doctrinal Issues led to Dugger's exit to Israel. In July, 1950 the Salem Apostolic Council met at Salem and voted the headquarters to be transferred from Jerusalem to Salem. Possibly this was the last straw that broke Dugger with the Back to Salem movement.


Severson reportedly went with Dugger to Jerusalem and died there later.


Dugger's Associates


Dugger's assistant editor on the Reporter is Gordon M. Tauth, his son in law. In 1960, Dugger established a missionary paper, Jerusalem Messenger, which reports on activities of ministers in foreign fields that associate with Dugger.


A traveling evangelist is white-haired A.M. Shoemaker. In Oregon, R.K. Hart of Bandon writes to Dugger's paper, as does Ernest W. Baker of Lake wood, California, Elder J. D. Stewart of Chicago and Black Aaron Reld of Brooklyn and V. Mclntyre of Mount Vernon, New York.


AGAIN  REMEMBER  THIS  WAS  IN  1973  WHEN  NICKELS  WROTE  HIS  BOOK  -  Keith Hunt


In foreign fields, these are some of the areas and men Dugger reports:


In Nigeria, Elder R.D. Orukwowula overseer of many Churches of God, which were apparently established in the 1920's as a result of Church of Godevangelistic work. Another Nigerian overseer is Elder J.A. Agileb of the Agilebu, Ogba-Ahoada area. A white missionary, Elder Kenneth Oglesby, has been in Ethiopia for 28 years, since 1944. Bishop Samuel M. Fab and and Elder Francis Thuku are in Kenya.


AS  BEFORE  STATED  FROM  WHATEVER  WORK  BY  WHOEVER,  THERE  ARE  18  MILLION  SABBATH  KEEPERS  IN  THE  CONTINENT  OF  AFRICA,  AND  ONLY  2  MILLION  SEVENTH  DAY  ADVENTISTS  -  Keith Hunt


Some of the Indian elders reported in Dugger's Jerusalem Messenger have been Khamzalang, Thankamlova, Zamkhosem, Douthang, Henngam, K. Isaac, Gindai Thang, Thangkhai, and Ngehpu.  Elder S. Matthews is overseer of a large district in India. A school in India with 70 students was started in 1971 near Pastor Thankamlova's home in Churachandpur, Manipur, India, the headquarters of the Indian work.  The Feast of Tabernacles is kept by the Indians.


Numerous churches exist in the West Indies.  Apparently Elder William Heuer is overseer of the West Indies in general. 


In Jamaica, Pastor George S. Thompson is General Overseer. Other elders there are McLish at Barton, Mitchell at Salmon Town, McFarlene at Hamstead and Reid at Miles End. 


Other workers are Elder J. Eudovique at St. Croix, Virgin Islands;  


Elder J. Ernest and Overseer Hilton Winston at Dominica;  


Elder Clive Peters at Grenada;  


Elder Hercules Charles, St. Lucia;  


Elder Persey St. Ange at Cayenne;  


Elder Solomon Bramble at St. Vincent;   


Elder V. Watson at Trinidad;   


Elder A. Nicholls at Tobago.


In the Philippines, there is Elder Michael Postrers, evangelist of the province of Zamboanga del Norte, and Elder L.G. Cabardo of Leyte. Cabardo reported groups of believers in Hilusig, Makenhas, Baybay Leyte, Taligi, Abuyog, and also in Satmon.


In Formosa, there is a Church of God group which publishes a paper in Chinese, "The Holy Spirit Times." This group originated in Peking over fifty years ago. While editor of the Bible Advocate, Dagger sent tracts to two Sabbath ministers, for them to translate into Chinese; one of them was Elder Pilquist.   The Formosa church reported to Dugger that there were one thousand churches in China when they had to flee  (1949) to Formosa.  A few thousand actually did escape Communist China to Taiwan.


In Korea, David G. Beattie is a missionary.


In England, there is a Church of God  (Seventh Day) at 83 Raglan Street, Lowestoft, Suffolk, where Elders Hart and Williams preside. They keep the Passover and the Feast of Tabernacles, and have done so since 1966.  Another is Pastor W. D. Robinson, at 12 Ancherton Road, Spark Brook, Birmingham.


Bennie Maxfield, a Negro, leads a church in Tulsa called the Branch of Jerusalem, and is associated with "The Day Star Foundation of North America."


In Burma is Elder Robin H. Seia at Kalemyo, Upper Chindwin.


South African overseer is J.J Kondlo.


In Israel, one of Dugger's chief associates in evangelizing among the Jews has been Elder Shlomo Hizak.


Dugger's African trip of 1951 apparently paid off, as many of the churches there support his efforts. 


In foreign areas, the appeal of a Church of God headquartered at Jerusalem seems to be an important element in directing people to Dugger's group.


REMEMBER  THE  ABOVE  WAS  IN  1973  AS  NICKELS  WROTE  HIS  BOOK  -  Keith Hunt


Dugger's Call for Unity


Dugger apparently does not have any firm organization, because he feels that all Sabbatarian Churches of God should work together. He certainly believes that his work is God's work, and not that he split off from the Church of God. He states that the 1931 Church of God General Conference passed a resolution by a unanimous vote that the headquarters should be moved back to Jerusalem as soon as conditions there would permit. Those who refused to carry out this resolution, Dugger believes, have separated themselves from the original "Family of Elohim" (name of Old Testament church Dugger uses in the masthead of the Mt. Zion Reporter, besides "Messianic Jews" as the name of his followers), and are a branch of the ancient true church.


The "Church of God," Dugger states, is now represented in all parts of the world with "the same doctrine, " with  "little differences on some minor points."  The Sabbath, Lord's Supper Annually, the inspired Bible Name for the Church, the Kingdom, the soon Return of Christ, the regathering of the Jews preparatory to Armageddon have been common doctrines binding the Church of God together.   He implores that we should "refrain from passing judgment  (Matt 7:1-2, Luke 6:37) and... in spite of minor differences LOVE ONE ANOTHER.


Dugger has further stated, "Let us all be one.  In times like these, all variance and divisions among Sabbath-keepers should be forgotten. All trouble forgiven, and all groups fellowship together, for they are the Father's children if in harmony with Rev. 12:17 and Eph. 3:14 and15." Dugger advises that the seeker for the true church connect himself with the group nearest him that has the right name and keeps the Sabbath, and be a peace maker, not bringing up strife.


Presumably this means that Dugger feels all Church of God Sabbath keepers of the Church of God should work together, and also look to him because Jerusalem, he believes, is the only true headquarters of the church.


Dugger and the Feast Days, Sacred Name, Anglo Israelism


Dugger himself keeps the Feast Days, according to the Jewish manner of calculating.  But he says that others do not have to keep them, because Paul stated in Colossians 2 not to let any man judge us for keeping them, in other words, Paul didn't take sides in the issue.  It is not wrong to keep them, and is even good, because they commemorate days of mighty work, not only for the Jews, but for the church.  In 1972, Dugger kept the feast of Pentecost on Friday with his group at Jerusalem.


DUGGER'S  UNDERSTANDING  OF  COLOSSIANS  2  WAS  TYPICAL;  THE  TYPICAL  UNDERSTANDING  OF  PROTESTANTS;  WHICH  IS  THE  WRONG  UNDERSTANDING  AS  I  SHOW  IN  STUDIES  CONCERNING  OBSERVING  GOD'S  FESTIVALS  -  Keith Hunt


Dugger appears to believe that the Feast Days are not mandatory during this age, because they were nailed to the cross, but that they will be kept in the next age, as Zecharlah 14:16 and 17 shows.


Also, in order to appeal more to the Jews, who are offended by the name of Jesus and Christ, Dugger also uses Yahshua as a descriptive title of Jesus. This is adhering to the Sacred Names concept. But like the matter of Feast Days, this is not a cardinal point.


SACRED  NAME  GROUPS [MOST  DO  OBSERVE  THE  FEASTS  OF  GOD]  DO  MAKE  IT  A  CARDINAL  POINT;  THEY  ARE  WRONG,  EVEN  DISAGREEING AMONG THEMSELVES  HOW  TO  PRONOUNCE  THE  "SACRED"  NAME.  SACRED  NAME  TEACHING  IS  DEBUNKED  IN  MANY  STUDIES  ON  THIS WEBSITE  -  Keith Hunt


As for Anglo-Israelism, Dugger wrote an article in the March 21, 1949 Bible Advocate from Stanberry, "The Jews' Civilization and Economy," in which he says all Jews are Israelites, but not all Israelites are Jews. He neglected to say what the Ten Tribes were.


Seventh Day Church of God at Caldwell, Idaho 


The third split of the ''Back to Salem" group was that of Olson and Groshans, who formed the Seventh Day Church of God in Caldwell, Idaho, in 1954.


Signers of the incorporation of the Seventh Day Church of God in 1954 were Joel Ling,  A.C. Olson of Wisconsin  (deceased), Paul Groshans of Indiana (not with the movement since 1961), C. W. Ogren and his son M.L. Ogren, and R. A. Schaeffer.


Doctrinal disputes appeared to be the reason for the new group.  Salem allowed a divorced and remarried person to be a credentialed minister (namely, Chris Royer), and Bartholomew said that people sinned every day, while Salem also maintained that a Christian is not born again until the resurrection. These and other points instigated a departure of some from the Salem and the Merger Group organizations. Probably the biggest reason was the one of the feast days.


Martin L. Ogren maintains that he and Salem generally did keep the Feast Days from 1934 to 1937.  He continued to believe in them after they stopped observing the days, and came to a firm belief in the validity of the Feast Days through C.O. Dodd and self-study.  Ogren reports that he neglected to observe the Feast Days for some years until he began anew in 1954-55. This appears to be a prime reason why the Caldwell Group began.


Background of Ogren


Martin L. Ogren and his parents met Church of God minister J.T. Williamson in Missouri in 1926, and Ogren was baptized (he was re-baptized in 1934). He moved to Idaho in 1938, and was with Salem during the years of division.   Ogren became a minister in 1952, having attended Salem's Bible College of the Church of God.


Ogren began the Caldwell church in 1952, and currently there are 47-60 in attendance.


Groshans of Indiana comes from an area that had long observed the Feast Days, but little yet is known of him.


Doctrine of Caldwell


The "40 Doctrinal Points of Faith," adopted on November 4, 1933 at Salem, West Virginia are held to by the Caldwell Group, with a 41st point, the Feast Days, added.


Passover is kept on the beginning of Nisan 14, with footwashing. Pentecost is always kept on a Sunday, the other Feast Days kept according to the Jewish calendar.   Unclean meats, alcohol and tobacco, and carnal warfare are forbidden, while tithe-paying, laying on of hands and anointing the sick is practiced.   The organization of the 12-70-7 is also practiced, but Ogren admits his group does not have enough ministers to fill the slate.   He is one of the 12, chosen by lot, while Art Schaeffer, also of the 12, is the current chairman.   He objects to the lot system of the Merger Group, which puts back into the pot names not chosen.


The Feast of Tabernacles is kept for eight days at a common place. In 1971, it was observed by 125 people at Puget Sound, Washington. And in 1972 it was held at a YMCA camp at Lake Wenatchee.


Tithes are paid in tithe envelopes to the local church, where they are used.   FulltinB ministers are salaried, and a Council of Ministers decides what to do with deviant ministers.   A ministerial school is in the process of being set up.   The church doctrine states that "no member who teaches a doctrine contrary to any point of our essentials of faith as taught by the body and published through our literature, either by precept or example, shall be considered a member in good standing of this body


Like Dugger, Ogren believes in fellowshipping with the other Church of God groups. One Sabbath a month the Nampa (Merger Group), Caldwell and Meridian ("Back to Stanberry" Group), churches get together. "There is only one church," Ogren maintains, but it won't be until the Millennium until they all see eye to eye.  He is not out to convert others of the Church of God into keeping the Feast Days. President Robert Coulter of the Merger Group visited him recently, proposing that Ogren and his group join with them, and promising that their Feast Day observance would not be hindered. Ogren maintains that some of the Merger Group believe in and keep the Feast Days, but feels he cannot conscientiously be apart of a group that teaches against them.


AND  THAT  IS  EXACTLY  WHERE  THE  CHURCH  OF  GOD,  DENVER  ARE;  THEY  DO  TEACH  AGAINST  THE  FEAST  DAYS,  AT  LEAST  FROM  DENVER,  BUT  TODAY  SOME  WITHIN  THEM [MAYBE  COMING  FROM  THE  DISSOLVED  WORLDWIDE  CHURCH  OF  GOD]  DO  OBSERVE  THE  FEASTS  OF  THE  LORD  -  Keith Hunt


He says Dugger keeps the Feast Days in Jerusalem, but believes that Jerusalem is the only place of worship.  Ogren points to John 4:21-24 as a text to prove the opposite.  An acquaintance of Dugger since 1930, Ogren and most of his church help support Dugger's foreign work.


Associates of the Caldwell Group


The Herald of Truth, the Seventh Day Church of God paper, was started in 1954.   Its current circulation is about 600, and some 500-1000 members are claimed in the United States.  A Spanish minister from Chicago says that there are some 80, 000 believers in Mexico. There are supposed to be some 40 native ministers in Africa, mostly in Nigeria. They incorporated with the name, Seventh Day Church of God, in 1925, and have been affiliated with Caldwell for 15 years. The Caldwell Group supplies them money, and literature for distribution. There are said to be many thousands of black African members, one congregation of a 1000 alone.  Elder R.D. Orukwowu, overseer of Nigeria, writes letters published in the Herald of Truth.


YES  AS  THAT  SEVENTH  DAY  MINISTER  FOUND  OUT  AND  WROTE  A  BOOK  ON  IT,  THERE  ARE  18  MILLION  SABBATH  KEEPERS  IN  THE  AFRICAN  CONTINENT  NOT  BELONGING  TO  HIS  SDA  CHURCH.   TIME  TO  GIVE  THE  NAME  OF  THE  BOOK:  SABBATH  ROOTS  -  The  African  Connection  by  Charles  E.  Bradford  -  Ministerial  Association  of  the  General  Conference  of  Seventh-day  Adventists  -  published  in  1999  -  Keith  Hunt


In the States, churches affiliated with Caldwell are those in Gait, California;  Richland, Washington; Wenatchee (Elder Easterly), and Everett (Elder Art Smith), Washington; Maywood, Illinois  (Elder J.D.Stewart);  Chicago  (Spanish elder Augustus Grenada); New Mexico;  and Ohio  (Elder Roberts).


Other writers to The Herald of Truth are Paul A. Dreher of Iowa, Elder L.S. Howard of Indiana, Elder Hubert Thomas of Oklahoma, Elder Joe Moore of Oregon and Viola Senn of Washington.


"Back to Stanberry" Group


Perhaps the major departure from the Merger Group took place in 1950-51. At Meridian, Idaho, the "Bible Church of God - Seventh DaY" was formed by elements formerly of Stanberry that refused to go along with the Merger. In spirit, if not in name, they constituted a "Back to Stanberry" Group.


Philosophy of Local Autonomy


The 1948-49 Merger of the Salem and Stanberry groups "did not unite all of the Church of God.  This great disappointment brought additional division, and it even 'mothered' more independent congregations. In the eyes of many, especially some of the former Stanberry churches, the merger showed that the Church of God had made the same mistake the Adventists did in the "schism of 1860" in adopting a "centralized system of government." The anti-organization idea, so prevalent in the Church of God in the 1860's, again raised  its hoary head, so that

the merger was only another futile attempt to bring unity to the church.


Many "free" and "independent" Churches of God have existed outside the organization of the General Conference since its formation. Their idea is that "the first step away from the faith of Jesus in the early days of this Gospel age was the path of wrong government. The simple eldership in the local church soon gave way to a presiding elder and later a president, then a bishop over several congregations, and then we know the results  — the apostasy." The "free" churches seek to recapture the "Biblical church," in both worship and government. They voluntarily cooperate in missionary projects. With no headquarters machinery, they can devote themselves to the sole purpose of preaching the Gospel.


Christ is the only authority they say they are subject to.


In the words of Elder Frank M. Walker, the Church of God is united — under Christ.   Christ is the "only ONE HEAD" of the Church, and the record of membership is kept in heaven (Heb, 12:23, Phil. 4:3, Rev. 3:5).  Walker states, "Jesus did not establish any such thing as we now know as a general organization in the church. There is no divine authority in the New Testament Scriptures for any general organization to direct and control the activities of the local assemblies of the church in general. The book of Acts gives us a picture of real unity under Christ without any general organization such as we know today,   yes, they had unity with 'Local Autonomy' or congregational government."


Elder Robert A. Barnes sums up the idea of local autonomy with his Harry Truman-like bluntness: "I'll let no man or group tell me what to preach." If all the Churches of God (Seventh Day) believed the same, there would be no objections to a central form of government. The local autonomy idea is only a cover so individual ministers can preach the doctrines that they want to preach.


NO  DO  NOT  THINK  SO,  IF  ALL  LOCAL  CHURCHES  WERE  OF  THE  SAME  BELIEFS  THERE  WOULD  BE  NO  NEED  FOR  ANY  CENTRAL  GOVERNMENT;  THEY  WOULD  ALL  CO-OPERATE  AS  BEST  THEY  COULD  WITH  EACH  OTHER  TO  SPREAD  THE  GOSPEL;  SOMETIMES  THAT  WOULD  MEAN  JUST  IN  THEIR  AREA  OF  THE  WORLD;  GOING  OUT  AS  BEST  THEY  COULD  TO  EVANGELIZE  AS  THE  NEW  TESTAMENT  CHURCH  DID  -  Keith Hunt


The Meats Issue


The doctrine of abstaining from unclean meats has long been an issue of dispute in the Church of God.  A "Seventh-Day Baptist" church on the South Fork of the Hughes River in West Virginia which existed in the 1840's, 1850's, and 1860's was looked upon as somewhat of an oddity. It termed itself "the Church of Christ," observed the Passover once a year, was governed by the elders, and forbade the use of unclean meats.


The Whites [of  the  SDA  church] for some time, until the early 1860's, believed pork was to be eaten.   


Carver states he always was opposed to its use. Apparently the use of unclean meats was not doctrinalized in the Church of God. Some did speak out against its use in the pages of the Advocate.


In 1908, the editors of the Advocate  (A. F. Dugger and Jacob Brinkerhoff) stated that they did not eat pork, but said other brethren did. And Brinkerhoff wrote in 1911, "on the subject of Food we must be lenient with those who do not see the matter as we do."


In the eyes of the pork eaters, those in the Church of God who forbade its use were mainly ex-Seventh-Day Adventists, or influenced by their views.     

 

Ostensibly, the split of 1933 resulted largely over doctrinal issues, such as clean and unclean meats, Dugger of Salem holding to abstinence and Marrs of Stanberry approving of its use.  During the years between the merger, many Stanberry ministers came around to the anti-pork position, and the Merger Constitution included an anti-pork provision, copied from the Old Salem  articles.


Those who had not changed their ideas and still held to usage of pork were for the Merger, but against the Merger Constitution which was made a test of faith.   A minister that believed pork was all right would not get credentialed by the Merger Group. Before the 1933 split, pork or no pork was not a test;  as Clair W. Abloom states, issues like this were "handled in Christian love." Now it was being insisted upon.

………………..


IT  IS  PRETTY  WELL  A  TEACHING  IN  MOST  CHURCH  OF  GOD  SABBATH  OBSERVERS,  AROUND  THE  WORLD  TODAY,  THAT  GOD'S  LAWS  ON  DIET  AS  GIVEN  IN  LEVITICUS  AND  DEUTERONOMY,  HAVE  NEVER  BEEN  "DONE  AWAY  WITH."


INTERESTING  THE  MERIDIAN,  IDAHO,  GROUP  OF  "INDEPENDENT  BUT  WORK  TOGETHER  AS  BEST  WE  CAN"  IS  STILL  FUNCTIONING  AND  I  STILL  RECEIVE  THEIR  MAGAZINE  "ACTS"  -  Keith Hunt


Keith Hunt