HOW  NOT  TO  BREAK  A  HORSE !!


IT  HAS  BEEN  SOME  TIME  SINCE  I  ENTERED  AN  ARTICLE  ON  HERE.  NOW  IT  IS  SEPTEMBER  20TH  2014,  AND  THE  TIME  HAS  COME.


TODAY  I  WENT  TO  THE  SECOND  DAY  OF  A  TWO  DAY  HORSE  CLINIC  HERE  IN  CALGARY  ON  THE  GROUNDS  OF  THE  FAMOUS  CALGARY  STAMPEDE.


THE  WESTERN  PART  OF  THE  HORSE  CLINIC  ON  BREAKING  IN  YOUNG  HORSES,  I  WAS  NOT  IMPRESSED  WITH.


ALL  MODERN  HORSE  CLINIC  TEACHERS  SHOULD  READ  THE  BOOK  BY  MONTY  ROBERTS  ON  HORSE  BREAKING  CALLED  "THE  MAN  WHO  LISTENS  TO  HORSES."


AGAIN  LET  ME  STRESS  TO  ANYONE  WHO  WANTS  TO  BREAK  AND  WORK  WITH  HORSES:  THEY  NEED  TO  OBTAIN  AND  READ  "THE  MAN  WHO  LISTENS  TO  HORSES"  BY  MONTY  ROBERTS.


The  two  day  clinic  teachers  have  to  do  something  for  their  money,  they  have  to  try  to  impress  you  with  something.


I  was  not  at  the  first  day  clinic  being  the  Saturday  Sabbath.  I  was  at  the  Sunday  clinic.  As  they  brought  in  the  two  young  fillies  I  was  told  by  people  who  were  at  the  first  day,  the  light  Palomino  filly  was  a  handful  and  gave  lots  of  trouble.  I  could  see  she  was  much  more  spirited  than  the  other  filly,  who  was  calm  and  well  mannered.  Through  the  hour  or  so  they  worked  with  these  two  fillies,  the lady  who  owned  them  said  the  light

Palomino  filly  was  trouble  from  the  start;  i.e. hard  to  halter  break  and  lead.


Now  the  lady  owner  did  not  have  them  from  birth,  but  they  had  been  around  humans,  so  they  were  not  "wild"  in  the  true  sense  of  wild.


If  you  have  foals  born  on  your  ranch,  then  it  is  easy  and  wise  to  halter  break  them  when  weaned  from  the  mother.  But  not  having  that  situation,  then  ones  that  are  difficult  should  have  the  lariat  nerve  rope  put  on [goes  around  the  ears  and  nose]  this  puts  pressure  on  sensitive  areas  without  any  rope  burns. I've  talked  about  it  in  other  earlier  studies  on  breaking  horses. With  correct  handling  using  the  nerve  rope,  you  can  soon  get  your  horse  to  lead  around.  And  you  should  do  it  this  way  for a  number  of  days,  so  the  horse  leads  and  you  walk  it  around  for  say  half  an  hour  each  day,  for  a  number  of  days.  Now  still  with  the  nerve  rope  on  you  then  begin  to  talk  to  the  horse,  stand  close  to  it  and  begin  to  rub  its  neck,  its  chest,  its  face,  around  the  poll,  speaking  soft  smooth  words.  Then  your  hands  go  down  on  to  its  withers;  eventually  in  small  steps  you  rub  its  back,  down  its  front  legs,  eventually  under  the  belly,  then  the  rump,  back  legs.  


You  then  move  to  the  halter  and  teaching  to  stand  in  a  stall  and  you  give  it  hay..... you  become  the  one  it  looks  to  in  being  fed.  You  continue  to  "hook  up"  to  it  in  the  stall;  you  must  become  its  friend.  It  is  no  longer  scared  of  you,  you  have  become  a  friend.  You  can  now  brush  it,  groom  it,  all  over.  It  takes  time  to  have  this  horse  hook  to  you  as  a  friend,  something,  someone,  it  does  not  need  to  fear.


At  horse  clinics  they  don't  have  the  time  to  teach  you  this;  or  they  have  not  the  horses  in  the  one,  two,  three,  stage  of  breaking  that  they  can  bring  in  to  say  "Well  this  horse  is  at  this  stage...here's  what  we  do  next."


The  filly  giving  trouble  at  this  clinic  needed  slower  work  like  I've  just  pointed  out  to  you.


Now  the  other  filly  at  this  clinic  was  already  very  well  mannered,  she  led  as  you  would  want  her  to  be  lead,  quietly  following  you,  very  trusting,  and  to  this  point  "hooked  up"  to  you.  Now  what  did  this  clinician  do  next?  Exactly  what  I've  told  you  before  should  never  be  done.  The  guy  picked  up  the  long  stick  with  a small  flag  on  it,  and  yes  started  to  smack  the  filly   here  and  there  with  it,  and  waving  it  around  this  side  or  the  other side,  on  the  rump,  and  all  what  these  people  do  in  thinking  they  are  desensitizing  the  horse.  What  happened  to  this  quite,  follow  you  around  as  you  lead  horse,  it  got  scared,  jumpy,  nervous,  untrusting  of  the  one  leading.  Everything  was  now  being  un-done  that  was  going  just  fine.


Yes  before  this,  the  guy  had  walked  the  horse  over  a  tarp,  got  it  to  lead  over  a  wooden  bridge  box;  so  of  course  the people  clap,  "Oh  what  wonders  he  has  done"  is  going  through  people's  minds.  The  other  Palomino  filly  well  the  man  leading  her  with  some  difficulty  did  get  her  to  stand  on  the  tarp  and  put  her  front  legs on  the  wooden  bridge,  but  she  was  still  not  "hooked  up"  to  the  handler.


Okay  back  now  to  the  filly  that  was  to  begin  with  quiet  and  leading  just  fine.  The  horse  is  now  nervous,  untrusting,  by  the  flag  nonsense.  He  takes  her  over  to  the  side:  all  eyes  are  on  the  Palomino  filly  out  in  the  arena,  not  really  seeing  what  the  fellow  is  doing  with  the  once  upon-a-time quiet  filly.  The  man  had  put  a  bare-back  pad [without  stirrups]  on  her..... AND  THEN  the  filly  sprang  into  action  bucking  across  the  arena,  while  people  gasped  in  shock.  The  filly  was  now  acting  like  a  wild  horse.  And  did  so  buck  a  number  of  times  the  guy  took  off  the  bare-back  pad  and  put  it  on  again.

Of  course  the  more  times  he  did  it  the  less  it  bucked,  but  right  up  to  time  they  stopped,  the  filly  was  now  un-nerved,  no  longer  the  quiet  friendly  filly  as  when  she  came  in  to  the  arena.


Like  I  say,  these  clinic  guys  by  and  large  do  not  have  the  time  to  go  slow,  and  really  "hook  up"  to  the  horse.  In  some  ways  this  quite  filly... well  you  may  just  as  well  put  her  in  a  chute,  put  a  saddle  on  and  just  rode  the  buck  out  of  her  as  the  old  cowboys  of  grandfather's  day  used  to  do,  ride  and  ride  them  till  there  is  no  buck  left  in  them.


But  that  is  not  the  best  or  the  humane  way  to  break  a  horse.


That  filly  should  have  had  the  saddle  blanket  introduced,  rubbed  over  her  back,  for  a  number  of  days  in  the  stall,  not  just  the  few  minutes  they  did  in  this  arena  clinic.


Leave  the  saddle  blanket  on  the  side  of  the  stall,  introduce  it to  the  horse  slowly.  Leave  the  saddle  close  by [but  not  so  it  falls]  for  a  few  days.  Introduce  easy  and  slowly;  you  have  already  become  its  friend,  giving  food,  brushing  down.  


I  have  done  it  this  way  as  a young  guy  dozens  and  dozens  of  times..... slow  and  easy.  No  flapping  this  or  that  around  them,  not  even  at  this  stage  trying  to  get  them  to  stand  on  a  tarp  or  walk  over  a  wooden  bridge.


The  main  aim  is  to  break  in  the  horse  SLOWLY,  kindly,  with  friendship.


IT  IS  SO  IMPORTANT  TO  GET  THAT  HORSE  "HOOKED  UP"  TO  YOU  SO  YOU  ARE  ITS  FRIEND.  THIS  IS  THE  BASIC  METHOD  OF  MONTY  ROBERTS.  AND  I  WAS  DOING  IT  THIS  WAY  IN  WHEN  18,  19,  20,  ETC.  NOT  EVEN  KNOWING  MONTY  ROBERTS  WAS  ALIVE,  AND  HAD  FIGURED  IT  OUT  ALSO.


These  two  day  clinics  have  it  so  much  wrong,  that  it  is  really  doing  a  bad  imprint  on  the  minds  of  all  the  horse novices  that  go  to  see  how  to  break  in  a  new  horse.  There  are  a few  of  them  that  kinda  show  the  right  way  to  do  it  with  a  quiet  horse,  if  they  do  not  start  scaring  it  with  flapping  things  around  and  trying  to  get  it  to  do  things that  you  do  LATER  once  the  horse  is  fully  rideable.  When  the  horse  is  fully  rideable,  fully  trusting  you,  THEN  you  can  advance  to  walking  on  taps  or  over  wooden  bridges  etc.


IF  YOU  GO  SLOW,  CALMING,  HOOKING  UP  AS  A  FRIEND,  WITH  EACH  STAGE,  YOU  WILL  HAVE  A  HORSE  THAT  WILL  ACCEPT  THE  SADDLE,  WHEN  IT'S  TIME  TO  ACCEPT  THE  SADDLE.  EVEN  THEN  AFTER  THAT  YOU  WALK  WITH  THE  HORSE  SADDLED  FOR  A  NUMBER  OF  DAYS.  THEN  COMES  THE  ACCEPTING  OF  THE  BIT  AND  BRIDLE.  AND  WALKING  ALL  TACKED  UP  LIKE  THAT  FOR  A  NUMBER  OF  DAYS,  BEFORE  YOU  MOVE  ON  TO  THE  DIFFERENT  STAGES  OF  EVENTUALLY  MOUNTING  UP.


I'VE  SAID  ALL  THIS  IN  EARLIER  ARTICLES  BUT  AFTER  SEEING  WHAT  I  SAW  TODAY,  I  JUST  HAVE  TO  SAY  IT  ALL  AGAIN.


Keith Hunt